Tag Archive for Sourcing

Why sourcing is only just starting #Sourcecon

I’m really excited to be at Sourcecon in Atlanta. the night before the event, and much of the talk has been about a post from Dr.John Sullivan that sourcing is dead. OK, not dead, but the title of the post is that the end of sourcing is near. This is, of course rubbish. sourcing has never been in more demand.

The point Dr.John makes is that everyone now has a digital footprint. finding people is easy. I don’t disagree with that but …

Can you find the SAME people as Glen Cathey? Probably not.

Will you look in the same place as me? No

Have you built the same reputation as me in the market we source in? Time will tell.

Can you read a profile and know what it really means? I doubt it

And here is the thing, sourcing is just starting. There are plenty of tools for dissecting and finding data that gives you the answers you want. The tools may no longer mean that you no longer need to know Boolean or other internet searching tips,but understanding what data means is a real art. It is not about finding people, it’s about understanding people. Things like who might be most ready to move. who has accumulated experience since they last updated a profile. Finding people might be easy. People are represented by data, and anyone with the right tool can find data, but interpreting data is a real skill. Understanding who is right for an approach, and who might be right for your offer is the art of the sourcer.

In my opinion, the art of sourcing is just starting. The easier it is to find people, the harder it is to source people, because all recruiters are ending up at the same place. The real skill is ending up at a place and with a person no one else has found, because the way in which you looked was different to everyone else.

My message to Dr.John is don’t mistake finding with sourcing. Anyone can search on LinkedIn and find 30 profiles with the right job title, or use the latest tool to find profiles that match. That doesn’t make the people you find candidates. That is the art of the sourcer. To find 30 people who look the same, but understand who is different. To understand that it is not about finding needles in haystacks, but understanding which haystack needs a poke around with your pitchfork.

There is much more to it, and a lot further to go in developing sourcing techniques. Sourcing is not near the end, it has only just started, and I’m looking forward to the next 2 days to discover where the art might be going!

Bill

Those Google Operators As Explained By Google

I make no secret of not being a demon sourcer, but I have been asked a few times recently what a Google operator is. It seems plenty of recruiters are hearing the terms banded about, and are reluctant to ask for fear of looking a bit foolish.
In case you fit in that category, I have posted 2 guides that i refer to people in training. The first outlines how you can extend your search to look for specific terms or a range of the results, and the second shows short codes you can use to replace the words. This saves a bit of time. A useful tip I was told was that if you are using an operator like “NOT” to always enter this in capitals. You can use words like “NOT”, “AND” OR” in your search as well as symbols. The symbols are included in the second article. Both are re-printed under Googles creative commons licence. (That means you can share them but need to add credits.)

The following is an alphabetical list of the search operators. This list includes operators that are not officially supported by Google and not listed in Google’s online help.

Note: Google may change how undocumented operators work or may eliminate them completely.

Each entry typically includes the syntax, the capabilities, and an example. Some of the search operators won’t work as intended if you put a space between the colon (:) and the subsequent query word. If you don’t care to check which search operators require no space after the colon, always place the keyword immediately next to the colon. Many search operators can appear anywhere in your query. In our examples, we place the search operator as far to the right as possible. We do this because the Advanced Search form writes queries in this way. Also, such a convention makes it clearer as to which operators are associated with which terms.

allinanchor:
If you start your query with allinanchor:, Google restricts results to pages containing all query terms you specify in the anchor text on links to the page. For example, [ allinanchor: best museums sydney ] will return only pages in which the anchor text on links to the pages contain the words “best,” “museums,” and “sydney.”

Anchor text is the text on a page that is linked to another web page or a different place on the current page. When you click on anchor text, you will be taken to the page or place on the page to which it is linked. When using allinanchor: in your query, do not include any other search operators. The functionality of allinanchor: is also available through the Advanced Web Search page, under Occurrences.

allintext:
If you start your query with allintext:, Google restricts results to those containing all the query terms you specify in the text of the page. For example, [ allintext: travel packing list ] will return only pages in which the words “travel,” “packing,” and “list” appear in the text of the page. This functionality can also be obtained through the Advanced Web Search page, under Occurrences.

allintitle:
If you start your query with allintitle:, Google restricts results to those containing all the query terms you specify in the title. For example, [ allintitle: detect plagiarism ] will return only documents that contain the words “detect” and “plagiarism” in the title. This functionality can also be obtained through the Advanced Web Search page, under Occurrences.

The title of a webpage is usually displayed at the top of the browser window and in the first line of Google’s search results for a page. The author of a website specifies the title of a page with the HTML TITLE element. There’s only one title in a webpage. When using allintitle: in your query, do not include any other search operators. The functionality of allintitle: is also available through the Advanced Web Search page, under Occurrences.

In Image Search, the operator allintitle: will return images in files whose names contain the terms that you specify.

In Google News, the operator allintitle: will return articles whose titles include the terms you specify.

allinurl:
If you start your query with allinurl:, Google restricts results to those containing all the query terms you specify in the URL. For example, [ allinurl: google faq ] will return only documents that contain the words “google” and “faq” in the URL, such as “www.google.com/help/faq.html”. This functionality can also be obtained through the Advanced Web Search page, under Occurrences.

In URLs, words are often run together. They need not be run together when you’re using allinurl:.

In Google News, the operator allinurl: will return articles whose titles include the terms you specify.

The Uniform Resource Locator, more commonly known as URL, is the address that specifies the location of a file on the Internet. When using allinurl: in your query, do not include any other search operators. The functionality of allinurl: is also available through the Advanced Web Search page, under Occurrences.

author:
If you include author: in your query, Google will restrict your Google Groups results to include newsgroup articles by the author you specify. The author can be a full or partial name or email address. For example, [ children author:john author:doe ] or [ children author:doe@someaddress.com ] return articles that contain the word “children” written by John Doe or doe@someaddress.com.

Google will search for exactly what you specify. If your query contains [ author:”John Doe” ] (with quotes), Google won’t find articles where the author is specified as “Doe, John.”

cache:
The query cache:url will display Google’s cached version of a web page, instead of the current version of the page. For example, [ cache:www.eff.org ] will show Google’s cached version of the Electronic Frontier Foundation home page.

Note: Do not put a space between cache: and the URL (web address).

On the cached version of a page, Google will highlight terms in your query that appear after the cache: search operator. For example, [ cache:www.pandemonia.com/flying/ fly diary ] will show Google’s cached version of Flight Diary in which Hamish Reid’s documents what’s involved in learning how to fly with the terms “fly” and “diary” highlighted.

define:
If you start your query with define:, Google shows definitions from pages on the web for the term that follows. This advanced search operator is useful for finding definitions of words, phrases, and acronyms. For example, [ define: blog ] will show definitions for “Blog” (weB LOG).

ext:
This is an undocumented alias for filetype:.

filetype:
If you include filetype:suffix in your query, Google will restrict the results to pages whose names end in suffix. For example, [ web page evaluation checklist filetype:pdf ] will return Adobe Acrobat pdf files that match the terms “web,” “page,” “evaluation,” and “checklist.” You can restrict the results to pages whose names end with pdf and doc by using the OR operator, e.g. [ email security filetype:pdf OR filetype:doc ].

When you don’t specify a File Format in the Advanced Search Form or the filetype: operator, Google searches a variety of file formats; see the table in File Type Conversion.

group:
If you include group: in your query, Google will restrict your Google Groups results to newsgroup articles from certain groups or subareas. For example, [ sleep group:misc.kids.moderated ] will return articles in the group misc.kids.moderated that contain the word “sleep” and [ sleep group:misc.kids ] will return articles in the subarea misc.kids that contain the word “sleep.”

id:
This is an undocumented alias for info:.

inanchor:
If you include inanchor: in your query, Google will restrict the results to pages containing the query terms you specify in the anchor text or links to the page. For example, [ restaurants inanchor:gourmet ] will return pages in which the anchor text on links to the pages contain the word “gourmet” and the page contains the word “restaurants.”

info:
The query info:URL will present some information about the corresponding web page. For instance, [ info:gothotel.com ] will show information about the national hotel directory GotHotel.com home page.

Note: There must be no space between the info: and the web page URL.

This functionality can also be obtained by typing the web page URL directly into a Google search box.

insubject:
If you include insubject: in your query, Google will restrict articles in Google Groups to those that contain the terms you specify in the subject. For example, [ insubject:”falling asleep” ] will return Google Group articles that contain the phrase “falling asleep” in the subject.

Equivalent to intitle:.

intext:
The query intext:term restricts results to documents containing term in the text. For instance, [ Hamish Reid intext:pandemonia ] will return documents that mention the word “pandemonia” in the text, and mention the names “Hamish” and “Reid” anywhere in the document (text or not).

Note: There must be no space between the intext: and the following word.

Putting intext: in front of every word in your query is equivalent to putting allintext: at the front of your query, e.g., [ intext:handsome intext:poets ] is the same as [ allintext: handsome poets ].

intitle:
The query intitle:term restricts results to documents containing term in the title. For instance, [ flu shot intitle:help ] will return documents that mention the word “help” in their titles, and mention the words “flu” and “shot” anywhere in the document (title or not).

Note: There must be no space between the intitle: and the following word.

Putting intitle: in front of every word in your query is equivalent to putting allintitle: at the front of your query, e.g., [ intitle:google intitle:search ] is the same as [ allintitle: google search ].

inurl:
If you include inurl: in your query, Google will restrict the results to documents containing that word in the URL. For instance, [ inurl:print site:www.googleguide.com ] searches for pages on Google Guide in which the URL contains the word “print.” It finds pdf files that are in the directory or folder named “print” on the Google Guide website. The query [ inurl:healthy eating ] will return documents that mention the words “healthy” in their URL, and mention the word “eating” anywhere in the document.

Note: There must be no space between the inurl: and the following word.

Putting inurl: in front of every word in your query is equivalent to putting allinurl: at the front of your query, e.g., [ inurl:healthy inurl:eating ] is the same as [ allinurl: healthy eating ].

In URLs, words are often run together. They need not be run together when you’re using inurl:.

link:
The query link:URL shows pages that point to that URL. For example, to find pages that point to Google Guide’s home page, enter:

[ link:www.googleguide.com ]

Note: According to Google’s documentation, “you cannot combine a link: search with a regular keyword search.”

Also note that when you combine link: with another advanced operator, Google may not return all the pages that match. The following queries should return lots of results, as you can see if you remove the -site: term in each of these queries.

Find links to the Google home page not on Google’s own site.

[ link:www.google.com -site:google.com ]

Find links to the UK Owners Direct home page not on its own site.

[ link:www.www.ownersdirect.co.uk -site:ownersdirect.co.uk ]

location:
If you include location: in your query on Google News, only articles from the location you specify will be returned. For example, [ queen location:canada ] will show articles that match the term “queen” from sites in Canada. Many other country names work; try them and see.

Two-letter US state abbreviations match individual US states, and two-letter Canadian province abbreviations (like NS for Nova Scotia) also work — although some provinces don’t have many newspapers online, so you may not get many results. Some other two-letter abbreviations — such as UK for the United Kingdom — are also available.

movie:
If you include movie: in your query, Google will find movie-related information. For examples, see Google’s Blog.

related:
The query related:URL will list web pages that are similar to the web page you specify. For instance, [ related:www.consumerreports.org ] will list web pages that are similar to the Consumer Reports home page.

Note: Don’t include a space between the related: and the web page url.

You can also find similar pages from the “Similar pages” link on Google’s main results page, and from the similar selector in the Page-Specific Search area of the Advanced Search page. If you expect to search frequently for similar pages, consider installing a GoogleScout browser button, which scouts for similar pages.

site:
If you include site: in your query, Google will restrict your search results to the site or domain you specify. For example, [ admissions site:www.lse.ac.uk ] will show admissions information from London School of Economics’ site and [ peace site:gov ] will find pages about peace within the .gov domain. You can specify a domain with or without a period, e.g., either as .gov or gov.

Note: Do not include a space between the “site:” and the domain.

You can use many of the search operators in conjunction with the basic search operators +, –, OR, and ” “. For example, to find information on Windows security from all sites except microsoft.com, enter:

[ windows security –site:microsoft.com ]

You can also restrict your results to a site or domain through the domains selector on the Advanced Search page.

source:
If you include source: in your query, Google News will restrict your search to articles from the news source with the ID you specify. For example, [ election source:new_york_times ] will return articles with the word “election” that appear in the New York Times.

To find a news source ID, enter a query that includes a term and the name of the publication you’re seeking. You can also specify the publication name in the “news source” field in the Advanced News Search form. You’ll find the news source ID in the query box, following the source: search operator. For example, let’s say you enter the publication name Ha’aretz in the News Source box, then you click the Google Search button. The results page appears, and its search box contains [ peace source:ha_aretz__subscription_ ]. This means that the news source ID is ha_aretz__subscription_. This query will only return articles that include the word “peace” from the Israeli newspaper Ha’aretz.

The Google Guide Advanced Operator Quick Reference (www.googleguide.com/advanced_operators_reference.html) provides a nice summary of the search operators grouped by type. It includes search operators not yet documented by Google, e.g., allinanchor:, allintext:, author:, ext:, group:, id:, insubject:, intext:, intitle:, location:, and source:.

Note: Google may change how undocumented operators work or eliminate them completely.

THIS POST WAS ORIGINALLY PUBLISHED BY NANCY BLANCHMAN AND JERRY PEEK. THE ORIGINAL POST AND A NEAT TEST CAN BE FOUND HERE.

If you’re not finding what you’re searching for after using our basic search tips, try a search operator. Add one of these symbols to your search terms in the Google search box to gain more control over the results that you see. While there are many search operators, here are a few of the most common ones.

Don’t want to memorize the operators below? Use the Advanced Search page to generate many of these searches.
Search for an exact word or phrase
“search query”
Use quotes to search for an exact word or set of words in a specific order, without normal improvements such as spelling corrections and synonyms. This option is handy when searching for song lyrics or a line from literature.
[ "imagine all the people" ]Tip: Only use this if you’re looking for a very precise word or phrase, because otherwise you could be excluding helpful results by mistake.
Exclude a word
-query
Add a dash (-) before a word to exclude all results that include that word. This is especially useful for synonyms like Jaguar the car brand and jaguar the animal.
[ jaguar speed -car ]Tip: You can also exclude results based on other operators, like excluding all results from a specific site.
[ pandas -site:wikipedia.org ]
Include similar words
~query
Normally, synonyms might replace some words in your original query. Add a tilde sign (~) immediately in front of a word to search for that word as well as even more synonyms.
[ ~food facts ] includes results for “nutrition facts”
Search within a site or domain
site: query
Include “site:” to search for information within a single website like all mentions of “Olympics” on the New York Times website.
[ Olympics site:nytimes.com ]Tip: Also search within a specific top-level domain like .org or .edu or country top-level domain like .de or .jp.
[ Olympics site:.gov ]
Include a “fill in the blank”
query * query
Use an asterisk (*) within a query as a placeholder for any unknown or “wildcard” terms. Use with quotation marks to find variations of that exact phrase or to remember words in the middle of a phrase.
[ "a * saved is a * earned" ]
Search for either word
query OR query
If you want to search for pages that may have just one of several words, include OR (capitalized) between the words. Without the OR, your results would typically show only pages that match both terms. You can also use the | symbol between words for the same effect.
[ olympics location 2014 OR 2018 ]Tip: Enclose phrases in quotes to search for either one of several phrases.
[ "world cup 2014" OR "olympics 2014" ]
Search for a number range
number..number
Separate numbers by two periods (with no spaces) to see results that contain numbers in a given range of things like dates, prices, and measurements.
[ camera $50..$100]Tip: Use only one number with the two periods to indicate an upper maximum or a lower minimum.
[ world cup winners ..2000 ]

Exceptions

Most search rules have exceptions to accommodate the ways that people commonly search. For example, Google will show calculator results for the query [ 34 * 87 ] rather than interpreting the asterisk as the “fill in the blanks” operator. In general, most punctuation and special characters are ignored, however there is a growing list of punctuation and symbols that are recognized in searches.

THIS POST IS REPRODUCED FROM THE GOOGLE INSIDE SEARCH PAGES OPERATORS AND MORE SEARCH HELP.

I hope you find this useful,

Bill

Finding the needles in the haystacks. A Google sourcers story.

One of the highlights of an excellent #truDublin was listening to Google sourcer Wojciech Smailinski talking about the type of candidates that he needs to source for the recruiters responsible for the engineering team in EMEA. It gave a fascinating insight in to how you can find what would be for many of us the unfindable.

Wojciech has been working for Google in Dublin for about a year, before then he had no recruiting experience but plenty of enthusiasm, and the excellent Blue Belt Internet Sourcing training from Johny Campbell at SocialTalent. He explained that his target candidates are hidden deep in the internet, well below LinkedIn or any CV database, in fact he went as far as to say that if any candidate had a prepared CV they probably wouldn’t be suitable for these roles.

Google receive 6000 CV’s a day globally. It’s a big pot to mine from, but the type of people they want to hire for specialist IT engineering roles are not looking for jobs. They are usually content and often working on their own products or projects. The last thing they want is a LinkedIn profile. The best they might have is a very vague one, because as soon as they put any detail, skills or qualifications on-line they get overloaded with calls and approaches from recruiters . The challenge is how do you first find the right target people and then approach them, when they are not hanging around in the usual social networks and places. 

One of the things that become clear when you talk to Wojciec is how he sees the sourcers role, and why a single focus is so important. This also illustrates the big difference between being a recruiter and a sourcer. The true sourcer concerns themselves with finding the people with the right skill set and experience to meet the hiring requirements. He doesn’t concern himself with detail like personality fit or retention in the business, that is the job of the recruiters. The sourcers find the people who meet the requirement, who are interested in talking to the recruiters, and the other detail is the concern of the recruiter. It makes sense, recruiters recruit and sourcers source.

Johny Campbell of SocialTalent has been both a recruiter and a dedicated sourcer. He talks of the need to shut himself away from the world and any distractions when sourcing. Physically plugging in the headphones, playing loud tunes before getting lost in boolean strings, starting with a very narrow search and working outward. it would seem that Spotify is now an essential part of the sourcing toolbox, and the ability to switch off and focus on the task is the key skill needed when hiring a sourcer. It was interesting how many times Woicech commented “that’s not my job.” This wasn’t in a jobsworth way, he is simply focused on his part of the recruitment process.

I can contrast this to a track at #truLondon about a year ago with Glen Cathey who writes the excellent Boolean Black Belt blog. Glen is probably the leading commentator on deep sourcing techniques, but he was quick to point out that despite his reputation, he is not a sourcer, he is a recruiter. Comparing Wojciec with glen, it’s easy to see where he is coming from. Whilst Glen identifies talent through just in time sourcing techniques, he is equally concerned with fit, candidate relationship and managing the process through to hire. He is the ultimate recruiter rather than a sourcer.

The big question then is where you find these people who are choosing to hide themselves away and don’t want to be found. During the track, a thought went through my mind. It as much about finding the haystacks as finding the needles. Identifying the on-line places where these people are likely to be hiding out. Listening to the sourcers in the room, these are usually the on-line forums. Both Github and StackOverflow got a few mentions, and the search in these forums was for the people answering questions rather than asking them.

SEO expert Ivan Stojanovic explained how he searches for the geek words rather than profiles. These are the unique words or phrases that one person might say (or post), to another that identifies the discipline they work in or the skills they have. He has used this very successfully to source from twitter, and of the 27 people who were placed from this exercise, only one had a LinkedIn profile. Ivan advises using the same geek words to source in these forums, and if you already employ the type of people you are targeting, they are going to be able to point you in the right on-line direction.

The other suggestions for locating those needles in the haystack:

> YouTube – Post technical videos or find specialist videos in  your target market. The commenters and likers are a good place to start your search.

> WordPress/Blogger/Posterous/Tumblr/Typepad/Jux/Posterous Places/Blogetry/Weebly/Live Journal – These 10 are blogging  and content sharing  platforms. Each platform has a search engine that enables search of all content. Finding blogs in your target market (using the geek words) enables  you to identify targets by author and also commenters.

> Flikkr, Instagram and other photo sharing platforms. – The photo sharers contain a wealth of names and job titles which are all searchable.

> Google profiles – Anyone with G-mail or any Google product will have a Google profile, and they are usually left open and searchable. This links in to Google+ which is the easiest of the social channels to search  through the “find people +” feature. This also allows for geek words for shared content in the stream. Anyone sharing content in your target area is worth investigating.

> Skype – The internet phone channel is one of the biggest on-line channels by users, few profiles are closed and are searchable. Whilst the detail might limited, when you find someone a message or call makes it easy to connect.

> MeetUp – Each week there are 100′s of meet ups going on across the world. You can search for meet ups going on by topis, tags, participants etc. Most of the meet publish an attendance list, and if the group is in your target area you might just find what you are looking for.

> Eventbrite/Lanyard/Plancast – Much like meet up, each of these event platforms are searchable and many events publish attendees and their contact details.

> Slideshare – The presentation platform is searchable and can be followed by presenter. If the content is in your target area then it’s another good place to search for talent.

These are few of the places that came out of the discussion as places you can search in when you’re looking for the hidden talent. The final challenge for the sourcers is how much requirements are changing by skill set. It’s a constant requirement to understand how skills are merging, and that the jobs Google are hiring for don’t necessarily exist in other companies. Some of the jobs did not exist even a year ago, It’s not about searching for one skill set in isolation but combinations. This means a sourcer needs to develop an understanding of the job requirements in detail skill by skill. and the priority of skills in each job. Different companies use their own internal jargon to describe skill sets. A modern-day sourcer needs to understand the market terminology and what skills mean what from one organisation to another. The other confusing factor is job titles, which are unique, anything from  chief nerd to disruptor have been hired in the last few months. The modern-day sourcer needs to ignore titles and interrogate skills to get the right combination.

It was a great track, with content worth sharing. It is about finding the haystacks first, then looking for the needle, and all the time with the right Spotify list blasting out.

Bill

New LinkedIn Sourcing App: Pealk

My friend and top UK Sourcer Martin Lee, who runs the cool free tools group on LinkedIn sent me over a link to a new app recently to have a look at, and when I took a peek, I was impressed with what I saw. Whenever I look at a new tool or app, and I probably look at about 100 a week, I use a simple criteria to judge it:

> Does it do something I can’t do now or does it improve on what I already have?

> Is it simple to use and follow without instruction? I like my tech to be intuitive needing limited support.

> Is the navigation easy and logical?

> Can I export data to work with my existing tech?

> Can I track what is going on in one screen?

> What analytics come out of the back-end?

Pealk stands up really well against all this criteria, and the version1 beta has just become available.

Pealk are another of the great start-ups coming out of Paris at the moment. I know from #TruParis, there is some very interesting work going on in the recruiting space at the moment in this region. If I was a VC, I’d have my eyes firmly on this community right now, and Pealk is the latest product from this area to catch my attention.
Pealk bill themselves as the number 1 search app for LinkedIn. It’s a big claim, and one I thought was worth checking out. signing up for Pealk is easy, it’s a one click sync of your LinkedIn profile, and it’s free, even if just for the moment.
The search screen gives you the option to search using the following fields:
> Search criteria (and this supports boolean logic)
> Company (with a filter option for only current companies)
> Position
> industry (with drop down choices)
> Education
> Location

Theres a simple tick box option to filter out your LinkedIn connections in results, if you want the search to be for people you don’t know.
Once I’d put in some test criteria, the search was incredibly quick. Much quicker than LinkedIn’s own search, and the results come back in a very clean format that is easy to scroll through. It’s also easy to go back to your original search and reset the parameters if you want to change the result for any reason. I like the app’s I use to have very simple navigation and a logical interface. This is one of the best apps I’ve seen in this regard. It is incredibly simple to use.
The results come back in a business card view showing photo, name, professional headline,number of connections, sector and location. Another great feature of this app is that the results are very easy to organise. You can select a profile by tick box, drag and drop the profile in to the side bar for export to another folder, messaging or saving as a result, select a profile by tick box for another action or star a profile for more attention. Another neat feature is how easy it is to view the whole LinkedIn profile even if you are not connected. It’s one click and opens in a separate window with the close option. There is no need to navigate back and forth and risk losing your way. You can also browse all the profiles you’ve selected to your” cart” one after another using the profile flow feature. When you view the full profile there is a simple 4 button bar that allows you to select the profile, star it, add a note to the profile, open the profile in LinkedIn or take it out of the search, and they are all one click functions.

When you’ve got your results in the cart, you can message people individually or collectively using a free text message template. Again you can do this without the need to leave Pealk and go in to LinkedIn. Working in one place on one screen is a lot more efficient for recruiters. Each user gets a really simple dashboard that gives you all your analytics you need, so you can track all your interactions and results in one place, and make changes where you need them.

Having tested a few searches in Pealk, I’ve got to say that I’m really impressed. The search results are accurate and returned lightening quick, and they are very easy to organise. You don’t need to be a great sourcer or understand boolean strings to make this work for you. Although I tried, I couldn’t find anything I didn’t like. With even a basic knowledge, you can make it work for you.

I’ve not spoken with the guys at Pealk to know what their relationship is with LinkedIn, though they display the LinkedIn logo next to powered by, on the opening screen, so I’ve made the assumption that there must be a relationship. The app is very close to LinkedIn Recruiter, so I have some concern about whether this has not come up on their radar yet, or if an agreement exists. If it doesn’t, I have a concern about how long they will have access to the LinkedIn API before they are seen as being a direct competitor. That said, using it now is a bit of a no brainer, it is that simple to use.

My other big concern is over the messaging within Pealk to non first level connections. The messages go out in invites, although the messages are different to the standard LinkedIn invites because you get an extra 100 characters and you can include a link. LinkedIn invitations prohibit this in the normal invite. My worry is that these invites go out as friends, and that is clearly not the case. There is a big risk of getting reported for spam or “I.D.K.” and then it’s not long before you get blocked or stopped from inviting people without e-mail addresses, which creates real problems. If your going to proceed with using Pealk anyway, I’d recommend taking time on each individual invite to show why the target has come up in the individual search and the relevance of the job according to their profile. A bit of extra time to show this makes the message personal and less spammy. (I know I recommend not personalising invites normally, but when you are using the invite as a means of messaging a job, I think you have to.)

Hats off to the 4 guys who have developed Pealk, Nicolas Lemmonier, (Co-Founder and Business Development Director) Anthony Simon, (Co-Founder and Marketing Director), Yann Hourdell ( Technical director)and Boris Golden (Co-founder and Lead Product Director).  If there are no API issues, I think they are on to a real winner because of the simplicity of use, navigation, speed, analytics and results. It’s in my toolkit already!

Thanks also to Martin Lee for another great spot and share, go join his group to keep up with more.

Bill

Pealk

CoolTools group

#ATCSource: Social Adoption – Some thoughts and advice

Pic Credits: Mike Butcher

Drawing to the close of day one at #ATCSource in Melbourne. It’s been a great day with lots of conversation going on. I still think the coffee breaks are the best learning bit (I’m a unconference guy), but the sessions from Jim Stroud and Michael Specht, and Glen Cathey and Martin Warren have opened the eyes to what is possible in recruiting.
The attendees remind me of those in London about 18 months ago. The questions and conflict around Facebook and personal/business space are much the same. There is a reticence to consider the channel, which surprises me given the well documented success of Paul Jacobs and Deloitte  in New Zealand. That said, it’s reluctance rather than refusal. there is clearly an open mind to adopt whatever is necessary to be succesful at hiring.
Much of the recruiting is in the technical, mining and construction areas. The candidates are hard to find, and tis creates a great opportunity for those who want to try something new and dare to be different.
It is easy to be a bit pretentious about the later adopters of any technology. My feeling is a bit different. Who were the wisest? The ones who made the mistakes or the ones who learnt from the mistakes?

My advice to the recruiters here in my session tomorrow is to be brave. You need to be prepared to make lots of mistakes and try things out. Adopt the Google principle of fail fast, fail often and fail quickly. Your wins will greatly outweigh your losses in the grand scheme of things.
Stop guessing if engineers might or might not be on twitter or Facebook. Glen Cathey summed this up when he said that he always trys the things he thinks won’t work first, so that he can discount them from a position of fact rather than a position of opinion. I like that!
At the moment, i’m sure the prospect of sourcing and social recruiting looks huge and scary. Break it down in to manageable chunks. start with what would help you right now. Perhaps one job, one search, one step. learn from that. Connect with people at the event and outside, they will love to help you learn. They might be local, they might be global, but that is what Skype was invented for. Get a win and then build from there, but expect failiure and be surprised by the success that comes your way!
We’ve talked a lot about tools today, and it has been quite transactional. tomorrow I hope we will get a bit more in to employer branding and other important topics.
It’s been interesting to hear what people want to do rather than what they have done. The appetite and need is here. I think that the attendees are going to get rather good at it.
My last advice, in all the talk of tools, remember that there is people in the process. Thats a big lesson you can take from lots of regions who might be a bit further along the adoption curve!
Bill

What makes @GlenCathey different? #ATCSource

I’m in Melbourne and sitting in on Glen Cathey’s session. Unusually, I came in at the start. I’ve always been a big Boolean Blackbelt fan. It’s like a bible for recruiters interested in internet sourcing. Glen’s talking about his background and what he does. He is talking in a unasuming way, but there are lots of wow moments.
Then Glen said something I’d never thought of before, and it explains why Glen stands out and gets the results that he does. Remember, in Glens first year he made 72 hires even in the pre-internet days.
In amongst the boolean strings and all the other wizardry he is showing people, to sharp gasps from the audience, he made a statement:

I’m not a sourcer.

I’d always thought of Glen as the ultimate sourcer. I was asked for a definition of a sourcer recently. my answer was that sourcers are hunters and recruiters are gatherers. The sourcers find the people, and most searches are quite easy, the difficult bit is in the human transaction, converting the names found in to candidates and then to hires.
Glen Cathey is a recruiter, not a sourcer. He finds people in the quickest possible way, and then he contacts them, converting some in to candidates and ultimately in to hires. The time-consuming, difficult bit is in this last stage.
Cathey’s view is that nobody pays me for sourcing or finding names. I get paid for hires. Taking this approach means he sources in the quickest possible way, and has not been seduced in to trying to forecast future needs. He concerns himself with needs now, sources at point of requirement , and then matches people to sell the opportunity. The key is speed, and using technology to do this first stage quicker and more effectively than anyone else.
My view on Glen has changed, perhaps he isn’t one of the worlds best sourcers, he is actually one of the worlds best recruiters who has mastered the art of finding people on the internet, and then sifting quickly, reading signs from on-line behaviours to get the people most likely to be hired. Perhaps this is because his background and training in psychology rather than technology, and it is his understanding of people that make him great.
#ATCSource is taking place in Melbourne today (workshops) and tomorrow. follow the twitter stream and take part!

Inside The Sourcers Brain

If you could pop the hood of the cranium of some of the best sourcers, and look inside to see just how their brain is wired, I think there might be a few surprises.

 
Technical aptitude, fluency in geek speak, programming etc are going to be there in abundance but it is all only part of the mix. you can learn all these things from a wise old sourcing master.
The most important sourcing skill however, and one you can never learn, is logic.
You can’t learn logic,and   whatever people may say, you can’t automate it. The most important skill that separates the really succesful talent sourcer from the average is the application of human logic to technology. i always find it amusing when trainers offer courses, or HR professionals bang on about teaching innovation. You can’t teach innovation. You can’t teach common sense. You can nurture those skills, encourage and allow people to take risks, allow time for discovery. if common sense and logic is missing,It’s not something that can be acquired.

 
The type of brain that thinks if this guy works at this company, he might well know someone who can do this job. I can’t see it in his social connections or his footprint, but I’m sure if I asked him he would, and if he doesn’t then he probably knows someone who does know someone.The chain continues untill the ideal person is found.
Having spent some time with some corporate recruiters recently talking sourcing and technology, it was pretty clear that many of their searches were falling short on 2 accounts:

1) They were always searching for candidates who met the target 100%. You rarely, if ever, get a 100% black and white match. The magic is in the grey. The bits you take out of the search string or the questions you ask to locate someone close enough to the spec to do it.
2) Thinking of the result of a boolean string as the end of the search. The people (i don’t think of them as bio’s!) you find are the beginning. they are the people who will lead you to the talent that you really need.

I think a lot of this comes down to whether you negatively or positively match people. Most recruiters or sourcers conduct a search and identify possible candidates either from c.v.’s, LinkedIn profiles or similar and look for reasons to eliminate the potential candidates. The reasons they are not suitable for the role. I have always taken the opposite approach. I’m looking for the reasons someone could be suitable for the job.
Finding those 2 or 3 points that mean someone either can do the job, or may well be connected or know someone who could do it, this is the beginning of the search, not the end of it, and the smart sourcer uses their brain to go and unlock the clues.

TheSocialCV.Com locates people via their social footprint and connects bio’s profiles, blogs etc in one place. It is a great sourcing tool. What i find interesting when using it is how a person often only reveals their profesional details in one place, whilst being present in other channels.

In a recent search for specialist employment lawyers practicing in Dublin, with twitter accounts, i found 40 people who matched these 3 requirments. Interestingly, only 3 of the twitter accounts listed their profesional details anywhere on twitter, The profesional detail came from LinkedIn, Plaxo or Google profiles. TheSocialCV connects these places, one to the other, to find the best channel to engage. While this tech will do this, the good sourcer is always thinking where is the next placeto look. Peoples profesional details are not always obvious in their social places, but the majority of profesions are represented in the engagment channels of Twitter and Facebook. The good sourcer connectsthe social places by searching for things like geek words in content rather than obvioud bio adverts.
we’re going to be looking at sourcer DNA at #truLeeds on the 23′rd/24′th june and the Australasian talent conference Source event in August.
To start the conversation, what do you think makes up the sourcers DNA?
Bill

TheSocialCV

BUY TICKETS FOR #TRULEEDS

#ATCSource – featuring Glen Cathey, Jim Stroud, Bill Boorman and others

The difference between Sourcers and Resourcers

Andy Headworth featured Julia Stone’s prezi from Sourcecon on his blog Sirona Says today. In the UK, we often get confused by the term Sourcer and Resourcer. When I first started going to the states, it was something that confused me.
Whilst it’s changing, most European recruiters still employ resourcers rather than sourcers. Having spent quite a lot of time with a few exponents of the art of sourcing(and I think it is an art!), the difference is fundamental, but quite simple.

Sourcers search for “people” who could do a job.


Resourcers search for “C.V.’s/Resumes” that list job titles or experience that match a job spec.




 

 

 

 

 

 

To develop a sourcing approach (and Katharine Robinson leads the way in this in the UK), you need to understand the difference between searching for C.V.’s and searching for people. It is a very different approach and methodology.

What do you think?

Bill