Tag Archive for LASHRM

Light Bulb Moments From New Orleans #LASHRM

It’s been a few weeks now since I got back from #LASHRM in New Orleans. I have something I always do a few weeks after an event. I take some blank sheets of paper and I write down a few statements and words under 3 headings:

> What do I remember? What were the light bulb moments?

> Who do I remember?

> Out of 10, would I go back again?

Just for a change I thought it would share the first and last sections publicly, and for the record, in terms of who I remember, it was one of the longest lists from any event. This was a memorable event with a memorable crowd.

My light bulb moments:

> If you only connect with people like you, you will learn nothing and gain nothing.

> Diversity is as much about personality as colour, race etc

> Your network is your posse who are in your corner.

> If we all think the same some of us are irrelevant

> It’s not what you know it’s who you know, and that’s a good thing, despite negative connotations. Network intentionally.

> When you reward people for what you want them to do before you ask them to do it, they are much more likely to do what you want compared with rewarding them only if they do it.

> New Orleans is both one of the 5 most friendly cities in the world, and also the 5 most dangerous at the same time.

> Gumbo with everything is perfectly acceptable.

> It’s better to be the party than go to the party.

> People who earn $14.5 Mn a year essentially want the same things from work and colleagues as people on minimum wage. People are people whatever the status.

> Creating opportunities for accidental engagement is the best way to get people to ask what they really want to know. talking in places like car parks and water coolers beats meetings in offices because of informality. Executives need to create plenty of opportunities for this to happen.

> 5% of the people influence the behavior of the other 95%. The key is knowing who the 5% are, what motivates them and reaching them.

>  Its more effective to manage the work rather than the hours.

> It’s easier to take the work to where the skills are than take try to bring the skills to the work.

> People have better technology in their houses than they have in their offices.

> Don’t be afraid to fly the freak flag.

> Best practice is not innovation.

> State conferences beat champagne headline  events for content and community.

> Police horses fit in bars.

> You can tap dance by fitting tin can lids on the bottom of your shoes.

>If you are communicating the need for change, you need to deliver it as a benefit to the ones who are going to have to do the changing, not the benefit to you.

> When you give an order, people will follow but absolve themselves from responsibility for the outcome.

> American service can be as bad as UK service, they just wish you a “nice day” after.

> I’d like to work for Rose Hudson, the CEO of Louisiana State Lottery.

> The worst and most dangerous type of prejudice is delivered by people who would not consider themselves prejudiced.

> You don’t go to work, work comes to you.

> Robin Schooling is quite brilliant at getting everyone together. We all went to New Orleans because Robin asked. Thats the power of personal connections.

> Everyone in Louisiana talks about their life in 2 parts. Before the storm and after the storm.

> User adoption is more important than technical capability in HR Tech.

> Most people operate their current technology at 20%.

> New Orleans has gone through the rebuilding period and is now in the renaissance period. Town branding is important for its citizens.

> Jazz is quite cool but Blues is better.

> Big Al Carson should be a worldwide star.

Thats what I remembered from #LASHRM, and it’s a big list. I remembered a whole lot of new people. Thanks to you all, it was a lot of fun.

And the last bit, my score for if I would go back, it’s 11 out of 10! Brilliant conference. Brilliant time, and I’m already plotting #truNewOrleans for later in the year.

Bill

H.R. influencing the 5% with @IncentIntel (Live Blog) #LASHRM

Paul Hebert is talking about incentive and reward. He is showing a scientific study that shows when you pay rewards, it has little or no impact on performance, but if you give first then ask for performance, the change is significant. It’s the law of reciprocity. If you ask people to commit to change before it happens, rather than when it happens, people follow through because they were rewarded on a promise and made a commitment. It’s an interesting theory.

Social proof is a big motivator. 95% of the people look to see what the 5% of people think is right and act accordingly. You need to plug-in to who the 5% are in your organisation. Communicate change by “everyone” statements, and get the 5% to act first.

Paul showed the results of an experiment where people were asked to apply punishments to the point where people were in pain. When the instruction was given as an order by a Dr figure, 66% of people followed the order, even though they could hear the screaming. It’s an extreme example, but it does show the power of authority figures. If you get authority behind requests, it will bring you a level of compliance, but you have to balance this with the fact that when people are following the orders of an authority figure, they feel no responsibility for the outcome. Responsibility only comes with personal authority.

When you make a request, work people storys in to the request. When a request is personal, it has a much bigger impact. Talk about how change will make things better for everyone, as well as adding a personal message. install change over time in small increments.

Use evidence to support change, but remember that people only have faith in evidence, data etc that supports their current beliefs. Look for multiple examples to support personal beliefs. People need to see value in change, and that is going to be personal.

It helps if you can offer a few options in change. Let your people have some control over course of action, and they are more likely to take responsibility for both the actions and the outcome.

when people have control, you have influence, and when you influence the 5%. You win.

I think Paul Hebert is probably the best speaker I’ve seen anywhere on incentives and motivation, because he balances hard business thinking with a bit of science and an understanding of what people really want. You should check him out.

Bill

HR: The CEO's View. (Live Blog) with @hughweber1 and Rose Hudson #LASHRM

I’m sitting in the CEO’s session on HR. The panel is made up of Rose Hudson, CEO of the Louisiana Lottery Corporation and Hugh Weber, CEO of the New Orleans Hornets, and being moderated by Mary Ellen Slayter with Reputation Capital Media Services.
First question: How do you define leadership.
Hugh: Being transparent and open and building a culture bigger than the organisation, where the people have more than a job.
Rose: My job is to make sure everyone gets treated the same, and understand that each person is treated as an individual. Appreciation features highly.
Question 2: What do you need most from the head of HR.
Hugh: He keeps me sane. HR should be more than admin and policy. HR is the sounding board of the organisation. When you go through change, HR need to be the mouthpiece for the individual. We want to create a place people want to work. We are as interested in the guy who sells the hotdogs as our top players. HR keeps the organisation moving in the same direction and feeling they are being heard.
Rose: The HR team need to share the same brain and think along the same lines. I need my HR (@RobinSchooling) to be at the table and to understand the people in the organisation. Hiring and retention of talent is the key challenge and HR is central to that.
Hugh; Our business looks glamorous and sophisticated, it is really about the basics. It’s about trust and motivation. Guys who make $14Mn are surprisingly not motivated by money. they want respect and recognition the same as anyone else. You have to recognise that people are valid as a piece of the machine, not the machine.
Rose: You don’t progress without passion. I’m CEO but I’m still an HR person, I’m not a former HR person. The big change in organisations is using professional thinking to the whole of the business. Forward thinking businesses recognise the value of all the people on the front line. your policies and practices need to reflect this.Businesses need to get on track with this.
Question: What is the biggest peeve you have with HR?
Rose: when I need information I need it quickly. My HR people can be too busy.
Hugh: I can’t think of any.
Question: Hugh, you’ve changed owners 3 times. what challenges did that present?
Hugh: any change is hard. Embrace change but don’t go looking for it.My job is getting the understanding of what the owner wants and communicating the change clearly. Working for the NBA is very bureaucratic. Decisions take time. I need to buffer the organisation from that. I need to keep the organisation changing consistently and being the buffer against the turmoil. I need to deliver individual messages to individuals and not take a one size fits all approach.
Question: Hugh, if you read things in the papers about the organisation, how do you keep things level?
Hugh: HR is not tactical. It’s important that if news is coming out they hear it from me first, and I tell it as it is. If I don’t get questions or concerns. We have a weekly meeting where we don’t talk, we answer questions.
Question: Rose, How do you manage a team spread across the state?
The most important thing is hitting the road and being out. This is without an agenda, letting the people talk and ask in person. I have to be there to share “stuff” and there are no secrets other than salaries. I need to be available to everyone, and use the meeting of opportunity in casual meetings to let people talk. you don’t get that in e-mail. I need to be out in person and share the good with the bad.
Hugh; leaders need to be real. We are human and make mistakes, and we need to be real about that.
Rose: Authenticity is key. What you see is what you get. You need to own your own mistakes and not pass on blame.
Question: What is the biggest thing your HR team have achieved?
Hugh: Our HR team created an award system with a dinner and talk for great achievement and contribution. This became a reflection of who we are and was another way of keeping our internal customers happy.
Rose: I can rely on them and bounce ideas. HR are tight at what they do. it’s crisp, clean and professional. Our employees understand they have a resource. moving things on-line and enabling employees to run their own process where possible?
Question: How do you communicate your 5 year vision to everyone?
Rose: Asking questions directly to people to share the vision and ask what they need to achieve it. All of the technical and operational plan comes from the people who need to deliver it, rather than top down.
Hugh: We need to raise the level of excellence to be champions. We have 28 players but a much bigger organisation that makes it work. We have tangible goals and clear ways we need to improve. For us, it’s more about the brand connection and affinity. We have had to connect the team with the community and New Orleans is changing. It’s not rebuilding, it’s a renaissance. We need to reflect the community we are in and treat the fans right.
Question: how do you change the view of HR as more than pen pushers/admin folk?
Hugh: The only thing that separates good, great and poor organisations is the talent they have. Whats the cost of rehiring repeatedly. If we get the HR bit right, the business is right. the HR challenge is understanding what the business wants, and communicate in HR terms what the business wants from human capital.
Rose: Make sure you have the right person to deliver the message. Deliver what the chiefs want, in the way they want it. blind organisations will fall.
Question: What is your biggest fear?
Rose: the biggest fear is that the bedrock of our organisation is the integrity of the lottery. Errors can happen in an instant, and I stay awake at night worrying about that.
Hugh: I never want to let people down, and I worry about the things I can control failing.

Question: What drives you most to want to go to work every day now you are at the top of the tree?

Rose: I’m motivated by what else can I bring to the table today. I want to do a very good job. I adore the people in the organisation and i want to do the best for them.

Hugh: work is not a 4 letter word. i don’t go to work, work comes to me. i came to New orleans 2 weeks after the storm with a young family. I’m motivated by the whole thing.

Question: Which of you has made the most millionaire?

Rose: I love to hear the winners story even if they want no publicity. To feel that energy drives me.

This was a great panel. Thankyou for sharing your CEO thoughts. I feel inspired.

Bill

HR: The CEO’s View. (Live Blog) with @hughweber1 and Rose Hudson #LASHRM

I’m sitting in the CEO’s session on HR. The panel is made up of Rose Hudson, CEO of the Louisiana Lottery Corporation and Hugh Weber, CEO of the New Orleans Hornets, and being moderated by Mary Ellen Slayter with Reputation Capital Media Services.
First question: How do you define leadership.
Hugh: Being transparent and open and building a culture bigger than the organisation, where the people have more than a job.
Rose: My job is to make sure everyone gets treated the same, and understand that each person is treated as an individual. Appreciation features highly.
Question 2: What do you need most from the head of HR.
Hugh: He keeps me sane. HR should be more than admin and policy. HR is the sounding board of the organisation. When you go through change, HR need to be the mouthpiece for the individual. We want to create a place people want to work. We are as interested in the guy who sells the hotdogs as our top players. HR keeps the organisation moving in the same direction and feeling they are being heard.
Rose: The HR team need to share the same brain and think along the same lines. I need my HR (@RobinSchooling) to be at the table and to understand the people in the organisation. Hiring and retention of talent is the key challenge and HR is central to that.
Hugh; Our business looks glamorous and sophisticated, it is really about the basics. It’s about trust and motivation. Guys who make $14Mn are surprisingly not motivated by money. they want respect and recognition the same as anyone else. You have to recognise that people are valid as a piece of the machine, not the machine.
Rose: You don’t progress without passion. I’m CEO but I’m still an HR person, I’m not a former HR person. The big change in organisations is using professional thinking to the whole of the business. Forward thinking businesses recognise the value of all the people on the front line. your policies and practices need to reflect this.Businesses need to get on track with this.
Question: What is the biggest peeve you have with HR?
Rose: when I need information I need it quickly. My HR people can be too busy.
Hugh: I can’t think of any.
Question: Hugh, you’ve changed owners 3 times. what challenges did that present?
Hugh: any change is hard. Embrace change but don’t go looking for it.My job is getting the understanding of what the owner wants and communicating the change clearly. Working for the NBA is very bureaucratic. Decisions take time. I need to buffer the organisation from that. I need to keep the organisation changing consistently and being the buffer against the turmoil. I need to deliver individual messages to individuals and not take a one size fits all approach.
Question: Hugh, if you read things in the papers about the organisation, how do you keep things level?
Hugh: HR is not tactical. It’s important that if news is coming out they hear it from me first, and I tell it as it is. If I don’t get questions or concerns. We have a weekly meeting where we don’t talk, we answer questions.
Question: Rose, How do you manage a team spread across the state?
The most important thing is hitting the road and being out. This is without an agenda, letting the people talk and ask in person. I have to be there to share “stuff” and there are no secrets other than salaries. I need to be available to everyone, and use the meeting of opportunity in casual meetings to let people talk. you don’t get that in e-mail. I need to be out in person and share the good with the bad.
Hugh; leaders need to be real. We are human and make mistakes, and we need to be real about that.
Rose: Authenticity is key. What you see is what you get. You need to own your own mistakes and not pass on blame.
Question: What is the biggest thing your HR team have achieved?
Hugh: Our HR team created an award system with a dinner and talk for great achievement and contribution. This became a reflection of who we are and was another way of keeping our internal customers happy.
Rose: I can rely on them and bounce ideas. HR are tight at what they do. it’s crisp, clean and professional. Our employees understand they have a resource. moving things on-line and enabling employees to run their own process where possible?
Question: How do you communicate your 5 year vision to everyone?
Rose: Asking questions directly to people to share the vision and ask what they need to achieve it. All of the technical and operational plan comes from the people who need to deliver it, rather than top down.
Hugh: We need to raise the level of excellence to be champions. We have 28 players but a much bigger organisation that makes it work. We have tangible goals and clear ways we need to improve. For us, it’s more about the brand connection and affinity. We have had to connect the team with the community and New Orleans is changing. It’s not rebuilding, it’s a renaissance. We need to reflect the community we are in and treat the fans right.
Question: how do you change the view of HR as more than pen pushers/admin folk?
Hugh: The only thing that separates good, great and poor organisations is the talent they have. Whats the cost of rehiring repeatedly. If we get the HR bit right, the business is right. the HR challenge is understanding what the business wants, and communicate in HR terms what the business wants from human capital.
Rose: Make sure you have the right person to deliver the message. Deliver what the chiefs want, in the way they want it. blind organisations will fall.
Question: What is your biggest fear?
Rose: the biggest fear is that the bedrock of our organisation is the integrity of the lottery. Errors can happen in an instant, and I stay awake at night worrying about that.
Hugh: I never want to let people down, and I worry about the things I can control failing.

Question: What drives you most to want to go to work every day now you are at the top of the tree?

Rose: I’m motivated by what else can I bring to the table today. I want to do a very good job. I adore the people in the organisation and i want to do the best for them.

Hugh: work is not a 4 letter word. i don’t go to work, work comes to me. i came to New orleans 2 weeks after the storm with a young family. I’m motivated by the whole thing.

Question: Which of you has made the most millionaire?

Rose: I love to hear the winners story even if they want no publicity. To feel that energy drives me.

This was a great panel. Thankyou for sharing your CEO thoughts. I feel inspired.

Bill

On the couch with Dr.Dan (live blog) #LASHRM

Dr. Daniel Crosby is among other things a behavioural psychologist who specialises in change. He is currently working with the U.S. Olympic tea on behaviours and winning pschology. He is a top line speaker. Daniel runs the incblot organisation. I love his approach to translating science to mortals like me.
Dan is talking about change. The 3 things we need to think about when planning change are:
>Cause
>Control
>Competence
Change due to circumstance is being forced in the current economy, and forced change is hard. The solution starts with communication, beginning with the why, and the why through the eyes of the people it is going to impact on the most. An hourly paid worker has no benefit to an increased share price or better profit. People work for more than a paycheck. if you communicate change just in $’s and cents, then they just don’t buy in.
Over control is another big barrier to change. control is a trust issue. If you over manage, people have no opportunity to display if they have the skills required because they are just following orders. if change happens because of orders, then it’s not a lasting change.
Dan asked the room the question “What do people want more than anything else in the whole world? There were plenty of answers like recognition and reward. Dan feels the big one that underpins everything is that people want to be competent at what they do, and it is this that brings people all the other things.
In change, we often ask people to do things, with no clear guidelines or metrics as to how far they have improved or changed. The focus of measurement is usually all the things an individual is doing wrong, and this just isn’t motivating. People need to be able to see increasing levels of competence. The old adage of catching people doing things right comes to mind.

To bring about effective change, first you need to apply a little extra TLC. Some people will naturally have some champions. You need to harness the champions to build the message and bang the drum, but at the same time you need people who are resistant to bring about a touch of reality and respect tradition. Tradition and the way things have been done are important considerations, in the same way that it is o.k. for people to talk about their concerns, comfort level and fears.

Change has distinct stages:

> See. People need to be able to see what the change is and why.

> Want. Moving people from intellectual understanding to desire. It’s a hearts and minds thing. We understand before we believe.

> Know. Desire is only as good as the tools for execution. Change can be all about theorey, when it should be about clear actionable steps.

> Do. Change comes with implementing the plan.

Bill

Incblot.org

Anarchy in the USA (Live Blog) #LASHRM

I’m at Louisiana SHRM in New Orleans, watching the opening keynote from Jason Lauritsen and Joe Gerstandt, the Talent Anarchy duo. Jason is the more corporate looking, and Joe is the angry looking one. They’ve been brought in to #LASHRM to do an intervention to spread their vision. They believe that getting on in HR and in life is not what you know but who you know, and how you harness relationships. It’s a statement I strongly believe in.
Jason starts recounting a story about how he scored an Executive HR Job, meeting someone on a golf course, playing bad golf and following up with beer. His golfing partner for the day Chris took Jasons CV to his wife who did the hiring and he got the job. Nothing unusual in this story but it is a reminder of how connections create opportunity. It wasn’t what Jason knew that got him the job, it was his introduction to a man who knew a man.
relationships are powerful, they are portals of opportunity. You should be working intentionally on your relationships rather than hoping they come along by accident. Opportunity shouldn’t just be down to chance. They are too important, and the divide between personal and professional are blurring. Joe describes these relationships as social capital.
Social capital is the value that comes out of your relationships, and this needs to be mutual. Jason explains that building the right network is like turning up to work with a posse. when you need something, you ask your posse first, likewise you are ready for when your posse calls on you. Jason talks about mentally mapping out what your posse needs to look like, and to start building networks intentionally, filling the gaps for what you need, and what you can offer to others. It’s acquaintances rather than close friends who bring new thinking. Joe explains that close friends are the ones you can rely on, but you tend to group with people who know similar things, but strangers bring something new to the party. For the first time, how I network makes sense, although it has always been accidental. These guys make a lot of sense.

Social technology has made reaching acquaintances easy, but it is not all about numbers. Size of network is important, but it needs to overlap with quality. If you can’t pick up a phone to someone and talk, then they might be your friend or follower, but they are not in your posee.

Jason presented the 6 laws of social gravity. They are:

1: Be open to connections. It’s not a one way street. Are you making yourself open to others. Are you creating opportunities to connect and talk with people. Jason tells how his HR team always ate in the staff canteen, rather than hiding at their desk. This meant people could connect without an appointment.

2: Get involved in meaningful activity. Shared space is finding things you all care about and work on them. Joe talks about how good leaders create opportunities for people to be involved and connect.

3: Always be authentic. Joe talks about flying your freak flag. Be different, and don’t be afraid to be different. If we all think and say the same things, then some of us are going to be irrelevant. flying your freak flag and being unique puts you in a category of one, that way you stand out and never get forgotten.

4: Stay in touch. Ask lots of questions, listen, find commonalities,take notes and follow up. Share specific content with specific people. Make sharing personal not broadcast. Find ways to follow up and stay on the radar.

5: Use karma to your advantage. If you do good things, good things happen to you. Human beings are wired to reciprocate. People in your posse are waiting for an opportunity to return favors. think of your network as a bank and make investments of goodwill, and it will come back. don’t just help those who can obviously help you.

6: Invest in connecting. Build your network when you don’t need it, because crisis building rarely works. When the posse is in place, help is on hand when you need it, whether that is advice, connections or anything else. You get what you have invested in.

These guys are geniuses. Talent Anarchy make sense of my network. You can get a copy of the book Social Gravity. It is going to be my Bible.

Bill

Talent Anarchy

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