How can i get some ventolin

I got a tweet today that got me thinking and reminiscing. I’ve had a Twitter account for 4 years today.

 

My first tweet was: “Can anyone see this?”. The answer was yes, but just the first person I followed. When I started tweeting, I didn’t really have any expectation. I had heard Radio One DJ Chris Moyles talking about Twitter, and figured that it was worth giving it a go. I had around 100 LinkedIn connections and a LinkedIn group. That was the extent of my social media activity. I was an old school recruiter. What could get out of Twitter with just 140 characters to use? At first it just looked like a lot of noise, and I was making most of it. People talking about Sandwiches, Matt Alder complaining about things, motivational quotes from dead people, motivational quotes from alive people. What would ever come from “wasting” my time taking part?

For a newcomer it was pretty confusing. Lots of advice, rules and twitter etiquette from people who had a whole 6 months experience, about how many tweets a day I should post, how often I should retweet, who to follow, to be transparent (but not say what I really thought because that would be bad for brand) etc etc. Before that day I had never thought of myself as a brand, I still don’t really. I decided to listen to all this sage advice, and do the exact opposite. I don’t really like convention. If you read my blog, you might know that.

I was in a bad place back then. I’d just closed my training business and had no work. I had time on my hands, and too much of it, and so I started. I could pretend to everyone (including myself) that I was busy, and so I just started tweeting. 100+ tweets a day, retweeting incessantly, in 4 years I have sent out 56,825 tweets to date, 30,000 in the first 18 months, and I connected with everyone. No real strategy or objective, no targets or anything else. I loved this new medium and the conversations I was having and I made lots of friends and got noticed and connected quickly.

What I klike best about Twitter is that I can find the conversations I want or have an interest in and I can join in. I can connect and speak to whoever I want. I don’t need an invitation or to ask permission. That is what was different about Twitter, and I’ve just kept connecting, talking, listening and identifying what I might be able to offer my network commercially, and the places I might be able to contribute.

I don’t know where I would be now or what I would be doing if I hadn’t sent that first tweet. I’ve learnt more from links I’ve seen and connections I’ve made over the last 4 years than I have in the other 42 years of my life. I’ve made many good friends, some of whom I’ve met. I no longer believe you need to meet people in person to be friends, that is an old way of looking at the world. I’ve built a global event business on a hashtag with #tru. I’ve spoken at, hosted or attended over 100 events on 4 continents. I know being social in approach and thinking works. I’m living proof of R.O.I. I’ve worked with companies like the BBC, Oracle and Hard Rock Cafe integrating social recruiting. I work with great recruitment product companies like RolePoint, Joberate and Colleague. I get paid to write content, whitepapers and even a book. I hope I give back some value when people need it. I could never give back as much as I’ve taken out, and it all started with one tweet:

Can anyone see this?

Bill

 

Free Whitepaper: From Transaction To Relationship: The Agency Opportunity

If you’ve seen me speaking recently at the Recruitment Agency Expo in London, you might have caught my presentation of the same title. this is the whitepaper, sponsored by Colleague, which outlines my thinking. There are plenty of threats to the agency sector, but their are plenty of opportunities for those willing to change.

Be great to hear your thoughts. Bill

#TRULondon Interviewers Personality Profile

trulondon300x186As ever, I am very excited in anticipation of #TRULondon 7 tomorrow, which is Wednesday and Thursday, 5th and 6th March. Whilst there is always a great time to be had and much to be learned from all attendees, part of the excitement comes from knowing that anything can happen, as nothing is ever predictable at #TRU events.

What I do know, however, is that #TRULondon will be filled with enthusiastic professionals involved in recruitment at all stages in the process. With so many experienced recruiters in attendance, we have a little freebie to whet your whistle. In conjunction with PCEvaluate, we have devised a unique Personality Profile Report for professional interviewers. The results of this report are specifically designed to show how your own personality, as an interviewer, has a direct effect on your interviewing style, and of course your candidates.
Try the report, and let me know how accurate it is at #TRULondon.

You can see the original on the PCEvaluate site here http://pcevaluate.com/trulondon-free-interviewer-personality-profile/

 

Purchasing cialis with next day delivery

Thanks to Kelly Services for continued sponsorship of #globaltru and #trulondon in particular, and to our event supporters Rolepoint, Work4Labs and StackOverflow. You make affordable events possible.

The #tru global sponsor

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 Buy Tickets For #Trulondon – 10 left

Guest Post: Ivo Bottcher – Extreme candidate experience #trulondon

Ivo is a Social Media enthusiast with a cross-disciplinary and cross-cultural background. He previously lead two candidate experience tracks at TruMadrid and TruGeneva. Within the last 2 years, he analyzed different Applicant Tracking Systems and focused on the use of HR and Social Media from an applicant’s perspective. He currently works at Small-Improvements, an award winning start up that provides a modern approach towards performance and peer reviews. Besides Human Resources and Social Media, he also passionate about International Relations/International Politics. Ivo will be leading the candidate experience track at #trulondon on 6th – 7th March. In this post he proposes a controversial fix for the broken candidate experience.

The candidate experience has been playing an important part for me for a while. Going through the application and candidate processes for start ups and bigger organiations in Europe and the US, I gained a lot of insights. For the candidate experience track at TruLondon, I would like to discuss these three issues:

1. Technology as an enabler and barrier for applicants

2. How to make ATS more efficient (and applicant friendly)

3. Application fees: A win-win situation

1. Technology as an enabler and barrier for applicants

Bill Boorman recently posted in a blog post about the candidate experience arguing
that “Technology is used as a barrier rather than an enabler,” and I could not agree more with him. While thinking of technologies catered to HR, I guess Applicant Tracking Systems is often the first thing that comes to one’s mind. Companies have found ways to manage and deal with hundreds or even thousands of applications for one vacant position. And applicants have figured out ways to write ATS applications and use the autofill function of their browser. Also, sourcing techniques and tools for recruiters are now available as new technologies are used, but applicants are aware of these and the world-wide web is full of blog posts on keyword doping for LinkedIn and resumes. So there are various ways to use technology as an enabler or barrier. During the candidate experience track at TruLondon, I will discuss these tools from an applicant perspective, and will share new technologies and techniques for using them. For example, applicants can use sales software (like yesware.com) to track their applications or use a gmail add-on (rapportive.com) to source email addresses of HR managers.

2. How to make ATS more efficient (and applicant friendly)

Applicant Tracking Systems are a great way to manage incoming applications. Nonetheless, for most applicants they are a nightmare, because applicants are not aware about what happens with the information after submitting, they are all different and take too long to fill out. And, in worst cases, applicants will never hear back or receive any feedback. Often job postings are not clear enough, and don’t highlight the “killer questions” or requirements with enough clarity. It is understandable that while working with an ATS, the sky is the limit with the number of applications because they are easy to filter out. But my impression is that companies do not really care about the time and effort applicants put into an application. An indicator that a job posting might be not good enough is when most of the applicants are not matching the filters before a company considers reading through the application. The goal of each company should be to receive a limited number of highly qualified applications rather than a huge number of less qualified ones.
Also, why not leave the cover letter or motivational letter out for the first initial screening (ATS)?. I always found it a pain to fill out ATS and submit a cover letter while knowing that most likely no one will ever read this letter when they filter me out because of a ATS category. It would be a fair gesture towards applicants to openly say that you need the ATS to pre filter because you receive too many applications, but also let the applicants know that after passing ATS, they must then submit a cover letter. This way the cover letter will be more specific to the needs of the company and position in question, which fits the interest of both parties. In the end, the applicant and the company looking for someone will benefit from this. And it shows that the company respects the time of their prospective employees.

3. Application fees: a win-win situation

Lastly, I wanted to share an idea and would love to hear some comments on paying for applications. When prospective students apply for universities, they are required to pay an administrative fee, e.g. a non-refundable application fee of $70 for New York University. Why not do the same for job applications? Of course it sounds crazy and unfair but here are my points:

- There still has to be a non-paid option. The paid option is a consideration service that guarantees a recruiter will take a look at my application.
- With a paid option, applicants will take more time to read the job description before applying and choosing to use or not to use the paid option.
- Applicants who are convinced that they are a great fit will take the risk and pay; e.g. offer a “I’m convinced I’m a really good fit application option,” for $50.
- The fee collected will be only used to improve the hiring process and to evaluate the application.
- This process has to be as transparent as possible to avoid unhappy applicants and fraud.

I understand that it is impossible and unfair to let all applicants pay for this; it might seem like fraud or scam. But what about having the option of a “pro” application that costs $50, which means that an application passes the ATS black box and applicants are aware that a HR manager will directly look at the application? In this case, I think of the fee as paying for a consideration service by the company. ATS is a barrier especially for unconventional backgrounds, so why not offer a refundable “pro” application fee that an applicant receives if he/she is invited for an interview. This way, companies can decrease the number of desperate applicants who apply for every job generically, and bring more qualified candidates into the hiring process. I think it will lead to an overall win-win situation; what do you think?”

You can connect with Ivo at:

Ivo is a Social Media enthusiast with a cross-disciplinary and cross-cultural background. He previously lead two candidate experience tracks at TruMadrid and TruGeneva. Within the last 2 years, he analyzed different Applicant Tracking Systems and focused on the use of HR and Social Media from an applicant’s perspective. He currently works at Small-Improvements, an award winning start up that provides a modern approach towards performance and peer reviews. Besides Human Resources and Social Media, he also passionate about International Relations/International Politics.

LinkedIn: www.linkedin.com/in/ibottcher Twitter: @ibottcher Personal Website: www.ivobottcher.com

Buy tickets for #trulondon. 10 left.

 

Introducing @MikeVangel. #trulondon

 

Vangel at #RIS11

I’m excited that Mike Vangel, the VP for  client talent acquisition strategy at TMP Worldwide and AIA in the UK, is joining us for #trulondon on the 6th and 7th March. Mike has been leading the way in mobile and social recruiting over the last 3 – 4 years, and has some great stories to share. I asked Mike to outline the tracks he wants to run, and his thoughts ahead of the event. This is what Mike had to say:

 

“I am looking forward to attending #trulondon in a couple of weeks. Hope you will be there, too, and perhaps I will get to meet you. I am a Yank from the states, Boston to be precise, but I work globally in the field of recruitment. I will be leading a few tracks so I thought it would be a good idea to tell you a little bit about myself in advance as you go through the thoughtful process of choosing which sessions to attend and which ones you won’t. Hope you’ll attend mine if you think we’re a good fit but it’s okay if you select out once I’ve told you a bit about myself.

I would classify myself as a “practitioner” that is to say I actually do the things I talk about. Interestingly enough, my son considers me an inventor. He may be on to something with that classification, too. I realize there is a whole cottage industry of self-appointed “gurus” and “thought leaders” who bless what they think is the tactic du jour embracing it as their own but never actually do the work. That’s not my scene and to be honest I don’t have much patience for any of them. They remind me a lot of the know-it-all jerks I had to put up with in high school. God, I hated them. Unlike them I say what I am going to do and try my best to do what I say I will. It should not be a novel concept but unfortunately in this day and age it seems to be the exception and not the rule.

I believe in first-mover advantage. If you are waiting for tons of people to tell you what will work, you are probably too late to get in the game. I believe in piloting ideas that hold promise but put them within a scalable framework to validate “proof of concept” as quickly as possible. I believe in the power of data and the power of brand. I only collect actionable metrics to define success and continually work very hard to refine those results. I am direct. I am honest. I would rather tell you the truth than what is a comfortable un-truth. I have dedicated the better part of my career to the sharing and promotion of best practices within the employment industry. I believe in giving back and paying forward. Again, not a novel concept but not very common these days.

Like Bill I don’t believe you have to charge people thousands of Euros at a conference to learn something new. Chances are you will learn more at #trulondon for £150 than one of those other conferences (probably filled with self-appointed “gurus” and “thought leaders” who’ve really never done the work) that will charge you ten times as much if you come with an open mind to one of my sessions and are not afraid to be told (or even better tell) an inconvenient truth.

I don’t get paid for speaking at events and never have. That’s not what I’m about. However, I have presented at Facebook, Microsoft, the Mobile Marketing Association and led recruitment conferences as far away as Australia. I believe strongly in the power of social media and mobile for recruitment and have the data to back it up. And I share.

I fundamentally believe Recruitment is very different from HR and I am glad that it is. I am not sure if HR will ever have a strategic seat at the table but Recruitment surely should.

The areas that interest me the most are:

1. Why recruitment ROI is so important and how to optimize it
2. How it compares with other sourcing channels
3. How to effectively use mobile to recruit
4. What’s worked for me and what hasn’t (sometimes I have learned more from my failures than my successes)
5. Identifying and stopping abuses within Recruitment

The tracks I hope to lead are:

1. “Complete Mobilization Is Possible Now.”
2. “How to Drive Hires & Establish True ROI for Your Social Media for Recruitment Efforts”
3. “Catfishing for Employers and Jobseekers” Why authenticity is so important.
4. “Every Time You Say ‘Gamification’ a Unicorn Dies”

5. “Is Your Employer Brand a Victim of Identity Theft?”

6. “Internal Mobility – Fact or Fiction?”

I am looking forward to a wonderful “unconference” at #trulondon and hopefully meeting you!

Cheers,

Mike”

I know Mike well from #truBoston, and a few other events over the last few years. We regularly exchange notes. You can get one of the remaining tickets to see Mike at #trulondon HERE. There are only 12 tickets left, and you wouldn’t want to miss it.

Bill

What impacts on candidate experience? #CandEUK #trulondon

I haven’t blogged for the last few weeks, having been out-of-town at #Sourcecon, and in San Francisco for a week working with social referral start-up RolePoint. It was a great trip with lots of learning, and new tech to look at. Over the last few months I’ve also been busy helping to judge the UK edition of the #CandEs, the candidate experience awards, which has meant ploughing through plenty of data and feedback, as well as interviewing the companies involved. Next Tuesday we are going to be recognizing the winners at a presentation in London. Good practice in this area deserves recognition, and the #CandEs UK presents the perfect opportunity to do this. I’m also delighted that we will be sharing the findings, as well as case studies from the participants at #trulondon on the 6′th and 7′th March.

Whilst I can’t share the outcomes yet, I have drawn some clear learning points on what impacts on the quality of the candidate experience. Lots of recruiters have good and honest intentions to treat candidates well, but process and volume of work ties them down. These are some of my thoughts on candidate experience:

  • The quality of the experience has a direct relationship with the quantity of applications.
  • The more involved in the end to end recruiting process the hiring manager is, the better the experience.
  • Few people consider recruiter experience, but the two are massively related.
  • When hiring companies use agencies, feedback is  least likely.
  • The candidate and applicant process should be two different things
  • Talent networks keep people and companies connected beyond the transaction
  • Killer questions in an ATS should be asked before applying.
  • Search should always come before broadcast
  • Technology is used as a barrier rather than an enabler

These are just a few of my thoughts. A headline in a newspaper today announced that over 1,700 people applied for 8 jobs at a branch of Costa Coffee in Nottingham. How can those applicants have any kind of experience, except a bad one. These are for jobs just above minimum wage. Surely there was a better way of attracting applicants, (like asking for referrals), than posting ads and getting flooded. Companies need to be doing more than talking about candidate experience. All of these applicants in Nottingham could well be local and customers of Costa. Don’t treat them well and they will be looking for their nearest Starbucks, and that would prove very costly.

I will be sharing the specific feedback after the awards. Join us at #trulondon to discuss candidate experience in more detail, from the #CandE UK awards and from candidates first hand.

Bill

Why sourcing is only just starting #Sourcecon

I’m really excited to be at Sourcecon in Atlanta. the night before the event, and much of the talk has been about a post from Dr.John Sullivan that sourcing is dead. OK, not dead, but the title of the post is that the end of sourcing is near. This is, of course rubbish. sourcing has never been in more demand.

The point Dr.John makes is that everyone now has a digital footprint. finding people is easy. I don’t disagree with that but …

Can you find the SAME people as Glen Cathey? Probably not.

Will you look in the same place as me? No

Have you built the same reputation as me in the market we source in? Time will tell.

Can you read a profile and know what it really means? I doubt it

And here is the thing, sourcing is just starting. There are plenty of tools for dissecting and finding data that gives you the answers you want. The tools may no longer mean that you no longer need to know Boolean or other internet searching tips,but understanding what data means is a real art. It is not about finding people, it’s about understanding people. Things like who might be most ready to move. who has accumulated experience since they last updated a profile. Finding people might be easy. People are represented by data, and anyone with the right tool can find data, but interpreting data is a real skill. Understanding who is right for an approach, and who might be right for your offer is the art of the sourcer.

In my opinion, the art of sourcing is just starting. The easier it is to find people, the harder it is to source people, because all recruiters are ending up at the same place. The real skill is ending up at a place and with a person no one else has found, because the way in which you looked was different to everyone else.

My message to Dr.John is don’t mistake finding with sourcing. Anyone can search on LinkedIn and find 30 profiles with the right job title, or use the latest tool to find profiles that match. That doesn’t make the people you find candidates. That is the art of the sourcer. To find 30 people who look the same, but understand who is different. To understand that it is not about finding needles in haystacks, but understanding which haystack needs a poke around with your pitchfork.

There is much more to it, and a lot further to go in developing sourcing techniques. Sourcing is not near the end, it has only just started, and I’m looking forward to the next 2 days to discover where the art might be going!

Bill

Saturday Infographic: 10 Mobile Facts For The U.S.Market

O.K, this is data from the US, published by a very interesting mobile development company in India (thanks to Joel Cheesman for putting the research from iMomentous). The message though has universal application, stop thinking web and start thinking mobile.

10 Facts about the Mobile Web – An infographic by the team at iMomentous – Mobile Recruiting

Pin it if you like it.

Bill