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H.R. influencing the 5% with @IncentIntel (Live Blog) #LASHRM

Paul Hebert is talking about incentive and reward. He is showing a scientific study that shows when you pay rewards, it has little or no impact on performance, but if you give first then ask for performance, the change is significant. It’s the law of reciprocity. If you ask people to commit to change before it happens, rather than when it happens, people follow through because they were rewarded on a promise and made a commitment. It’s an interesting theory.

Social proof is a big motivator. 95% of the people look to see what the 5% of people think is right and act accordingly. You need to plug-in to who the 5% are in your organisation. Communicate change by “everyone” statements, and get the 5% to act first.

Paul showed the results of an experiment where people were asked to apply punishments to the point where people were in pain. When the instruction was given as an order by a Dr figure, 66% of people followed the order, even though they could hear the screaming. It’s an extreme example, but it does show the power of authority figures. If you get authority behind requests, it will bring you a level of compliance, but you have to balance this with the fact that when people are following the orders of an authority figure, they feel no responsibility for the outcome. Responsibility only comes with personal authority.

When you make a request, work people storys in to the request. When a request is personal, it has a much bigger impact. Talk about how change will make things better for everyone, as well as adding a personal message. install change over time in small increments.

Use evidence to support change, but remember that people only have faith in evidence, data etc that supports their current beliefs. Look for multiple examples to support personal beliefs. People need to see value in change, and that is going to be personal.

It helps if you can offer a few options in change. Let your people have some control over course of action, and they are more likely to take responsibility for both the actions and the outcome.

when people have control, you have influence, and when you influence the 5%. You win.

I think Paul Hebert is probably the best speaker I’ve seen anywhere on incentives and motivation, because he balances hard business thinking with a bit of science and an understanding of what people really want. You should check him out.

Bill

HR: The CEO’s View. (Live Blog) with @hughweber1 and Rose Hudson #LASHRM

I’m sitting in the CEO’s session on HR. The panel is made up of Rose Hudson, CEO of the Louisiana Lottery Corporation and Hugh Weber, CEO of the New Orleans Hornets, and being moderated by Mary Ellen Slayter with Reputation Capital Media Services.
First question: How do you define leadership.
Hugh: Being transparent and open and building a culture bigger than the organisation, where the people have more than a job.
Rose: My job is to make sure everyone gets treated the same, and understand that each person is treated as an individual. Appreciation features highly.
Question 2: What do you need most from the head of HR.
Hugh: He keeps me sane. HR should be more than admin and policy. HR is the sounding board of the organisation. When you go through change, HR need to be the mouthpiece for the individual. We want to create a place people want to work. We are as interested in the guy who sells the hotdogs as our top players. HR keeps the organisation moving in the same direction and feeling they are being heard.
Rose: The HR team need to share the same brain and think along the same lines. I need my HR (@RobinSchooling) to be at the table and to understand the people in the organisation. Hiring and retention of talent is the key challenge and HR is central to that.
Hugh; Our business looks glamorous and sophisticated, it is really about the basics. It’s about trust and motivation. Guys who make $14Mn are surprisingly not motivated by money. they want respect and recognition the same as anyone else. You have to recognise that people are valid as a piece of the machine, not the machine.
Rose: You don’t progress without passion. I’m CEO but I’m still an HR person, I’m not a former HR person. The big change in organisations is using professional thinking to the whole of the business. Forward thinking businesses recognise the value of all the people on the front line. your policies and practices need to reflect this.Businesses need to get on track with this.
Question: What is the biggest peeve you have with HR?
Rose: when I need information I need it quickly. My HR people can be too busy.
Hugh: I can’t think of any.
Question: Hugh, you’ve changed owners 3 times. what challenges did that present?
Hugh: any change is hard. Embrace change but don’t go looking for it.My job is getting the understanding of what the owner wants and communicating the change clearly. Working for the NBA is very bureaucratic. Decisions take time. I need to buffer the organisation from that. I need to keep the organisation changing consistently and being the buffer against the turmoil. I need to deliver individual messages to individuals and not take a one size fits all approach.
Question: Hugh, if you read things in the papers about the organisation, how do you keep things level?
Hugh: HR is not tactical. It’s important that if news is coming out they hear it from me first, and I tell it as it is. If I don’t get questions or concerns. We have a weekly meeting where we don’t talk, we answer questions.
Question: Rose, How do you manage a team spread across the state?
The most important thing is hitting the road and being out. This is without an agenda, letting the people talk and ask in person. I have to be there to share “stuff” and there are no secrets other than salaries. I need to be available to everyone, and use the meeting of opportunity in casual meetings to let people talk. you don’t get that in e-mail. I need to be out in person and share the good with the bad.
Hugh; leaders need to be real. We are human and make mistakes, and we need to be real about that.
Rose: Authenticity is key. What you see is what you get. You need to own your own mistakes and not pass on blame.
Question: What is the biggest thing your HR team have achieved?
Hugh: Our HR team created an award system with a dinner and talk for great achievement and contribution. This became a reflection of who we are and was another way of keeping our internal customers happy.
Rose: I can rely on them and bounce ideas. HR are tight at what they do. it’s crisp, clean and professional. Our employees understand they have a resource. moving things on-line and enabling employees to run their own process where possible?
Question: How do you communicate your 5 year vision to everyone?
Rose: Asking questions directly to people to share the vision and ask what they need to achieve it. All of the technical and operational plan comes from the people who need to deliver it, rather than top down.
Hugh: We need to raise the level of excellence to be champions. We have 28 players but a much bigger organisation that makes it work. We have tangible goals and clear ways we need to improve. For us, it’s more about the brand connection and affinity. We have had to connect the team with the community and New Orleans is changing. It’s not rebuilding, it’s a renaissance. We need to reflect the community we are in and treat the fans right.
Question: how do you change the view of HR as more than pen pushers/admin folk?
Hugh: The only thing that separates good, great and poor organisations is the talent they have. Whats the cost of rehiring repeatedly. If we get the HR bit right, the business is right. the HR challenge is understanding what the business wants, and communicate in HR terms what the business wants from human capital.
Rose: Make sure you have the right person to deliver the message. Deliver what the chiefs want, in the way they want it. blind organisations will fall.
Question: What is your biggest fear?
Rose: the biggest fear is that the bedrock of our organisation is the integrity of the lottery. Errors can happen in an instant, and I stay awake at night worrying about that.
Hugh: I never want to let people down, and I worry about the things I can control failing.

Question: What drives you most to want to go to work every day now you are at the top of the tree?

Rose: I’m motivated by what else can I bring to the table today. I want to do a very good job. I adore the people in the organisation and i want to do the best for them.

Hugh: work is not a 4 letter word. i don’t go to work, work comes to me. i came to New orleans 2 weeks after the storm with a young family. I’m motivated by the whole thing.

Question: Which of you has made the most millionaire?

Rose: I love to hear the winners story even if they want no publicity. To feel that energy drives me.

This was a great panel. Thankyou for sharing your CEO thoughts. I feel inspired.

Bill

HR: The CEO's View. (Live Blog) with @hughweber1 and Rose Hudson #LASHRM

I’m sitting in the CEO’s session on HR. The panel is made up of Rose Hudson, CEO of the Louisiana Lottery Corporation and Hugh Weber, CEO of the New Orleans Hornets, and being moderated by Mary Ellen Slayter with Reputation Capital Media Services.
First question: How do you define leadership.
Hugh: Being transparent and open and building a culture bigger than the organisation, where the people have more than a job.
Rose: My job is to make sure everyone gets treated the same, and understand that each person is treated as an individual. Appreciation features highly.
Question 2: What do you need most from the head of HR.
Hugh: He keeps me sane. HR should be more than admin and policy. HR is the sounding board of the organisation. When you go through change, HR need to be the mouthpiece for the individual. We want to create a place people want to work. We are as interested in the guy who sells the hotdogs as our top players. HR keeps the organisation moving in the same direction and feeling they are being heard.
Rose: The HR team need to share the same brain and think along the same lines. I need my HR (@RobinSchooling) to be at the table and to understand the people in the organisation. Hiring and retention of talent is the key challenge and HR is central to that.
Hugh; Our business looks glamorous and sophisticated, it is really about the basics. It’s about trust and motivation. Guys who make $14Mn are surprisingly not motivated by money. they want respect and recognition the same as anyone else. You have to recognise that people are valid as a piece of the machine, not the machine.
Rose: You don’t progress without passion. I’m CEO but I’m still an HR person, I’m not a former HR person. The big change in organisations is using professional thinking to the whole of the business. Forward thinking businesses recognise the value of all the people on the front line. your policies and practices need to reflect this.Businesses need to get on track with this.
Question: What is the biggest peeve you have with HR?
Rose: when I need information I need it quickly. My HR people can be too busy.
Hugh: I can’t think of any.
Question: Hugh, you’ve changed owners 3 times. what challenges did that present?
Hugh: any change is hard. Embrace change but don’t go looking for it.My job is getting the understanding of what the owner wants and communicating the change clearly. Working for the NBA is very bureaucratic. Decisions take time. I need to buffer the organisation from that. I need to keep the organisation changing consistently and being the buffer against the turmoil. I need to deliver individual messages to individuals and not take a one size fits all approach.
Question: Hugh, if you read things in the papers about the organisation, how do you keep things level?
Hugh: HR is not tactical. It’s important that if news is coming out they hear it from me first, and I tell it as it is. If I don’t get questions or concerns. We have a weekly meeting where we don’t talk, we answer questions.
Question: Rose, How do you manage a team spread across the state?
The most important thing is hitting the road and being out. This is without an agenda, letting the people talk and ask in person. I have to be there to share “stuff” and there are no secrets other than salaries. I need to be available to everyone, and use the meeting of opportunity in casual meetings to let people talk. you don’t get that in e-mail. I need to be out in person and share the good with the bad.
Hugh; leaders need to be real. We are human and make mistakes, and we need to be real about that.
Rose: Authenticity is key. What you see is what you get. You need to own your own mistakes and not pass on blame.
Question: What is the biggest thing your HR team have achieved?
Hugh: Our HR team created an award system with a dinner and talk for great achievement and contribution. This became a reflection of who we are and was another way of keeping our internal customers happy.
Rose: I can rely on them and bounce ideas. HR are tight at what they do. it’s crisp, clean and professional. Our employees understand they have a resource. moving things on-line and enabling employees to run their own process where possible?
Question: How do you communicate your 5 year vision to everyone?
Rose: Asking questions directly to people to share the vision and ask what they need to achieve it. All of the technical and operational plan comes from the people who need to deliver it, rather than top down.
Hugh: We need to raise the level of excellence to be champions. We have 28 players but a much bigger organisation that makes it work. We have tangible goals and clear ways we need to improve. For us, it’s more about the brand connection and affinity. We have had to connect the team with the community and New Orleans is changing. It’s not rebuilding, it’s a renaissance. We need to reflect the community we are in and treat the fans right.
Question: how do you change the view of HR as more than pen pushers/admin folk?
Hugh: The only thing that separates good, great and poor organisations is the talent they have. Whats the cost of rehiring repeatedly. If we get the HR bit right, the business is right. the HR challenge is understanding what the business wants, and communicate in HR terms what the business wants from human capital.
Rose: Make sure you have the right person to deliver the message. Deliver what the chiefs want, in the way they want it. blind organisations will fall.
Question: What is your biggest fear?
Rose: the biggest fear is that the bedrock of our organisation is the integrity of the lottery. Errors can happen in an instant, and I stay awake at night worrying about that.
Hugh: I never want to let people down, and I worry about the things I can control failing.

Question: What drives you most to want to go to work every day now you are at the top of the tree?

Rose: I’m motivated by what else can I bring to the table today. I want to do a very good job. I adore the people in the organisation and i want to do the best for them.

Hugh: work is not a 4 letter word. i don’t go to work, work comes to me. i came to New orleans 2 weeks after the storm with a young family. I’m motivated by the whole thing.

Question: Which of you has made the most millionaire?

Rose: I love to hear the winners story even if they want no publicity. To feel that energy drives me.

This was a great panel. Thankyou for sharing your CEO thoughts. I feel inspired.

Bill

Anarchy in the USA (Live Blog) #LASHRM

I’m at Louisiana SHRM in New Orleans, watching the opening keynote from Jason Lauritsen and Joe Gerstandt, the Talent Anarchy duo. Jason is the more corporate looking, and Joe is the angry looking one. They’ve been brought in to #LASHRM to do an intervention to spread their vision. They believe that getting on in HR and in life is not what you know but who you know, and how you harness relationships. It’s a statement I strongly believe in.
Jason starts recounting a story about how he scored an Executive HR Job, meeting someone on a golf course, playing bad golf and following up with beer. His golfing partner for the day Chris took Jasons CV to his wife who did the hiring and he got the job. Nothing unusual in this story but it is a reminder of how connections create opportunity. It wasn’t what Jason knew that got him the job, it was his introduction to a man who knew a man.
relationships are powerful, they are portals of opportunity. You should be working intentionally on your relationships rather than hoping they come along by accident. Opportunity shouldn’t just be down to chance. They are too important, and the divide between personal and professional are blurring. Joe describes these relationships as social capital.
Social capital is the value that comes out of your relationships, and this needs to be mutual. Jason explains that building the right network is like turning up to work with a posse. when you need something, you ask your posse first, likewise you are ready for when your posse calls on you. Jason talks about mentally mapping out what your posse needs to look like, and to start building networks intentionally, filling the gaps for what you need, and what you can offer to others. It’s acquaintances rather than close friends who bring new thinking. Joe explains that close friends are the ones you can rely on, but you tend to group with people who know similar things, but strangers bring something new to the party. For the first time, how I network makes sense, although it has always been accidental. These guys make a lot of sense.

Social technology has made reaching acquaintances easy, but it is not all about numbers. Size of network is important, but it needs to overlap with quality. If you can’t pick up a phone to someone and talk, then they might be your friend or follower, but they are not in your posee.

Jason presented the 6 laws of social gravity. They are:

1: Be open to connections. It’s not a one way street. Are you making yourself open to others. Are you creating opportunities to connect and talk with people. Jason tells how his HR team always ate in the staff canteen, rather than hiding at their desk. This meant people could connect without an appointment.

2: Get involved in meaningful activity. Shared space is finding things you all care about and work on them. Joe talks about how good leaders create opportunities for people to be involved and connect.

3: Always be authentic. Joe talks about flying your freak flag. Be different, and don’t be afraid to be different. If we all think and say the same things, then some of us are going to be irrelevant. flying your freak flag and being unique puts you in a category of one, that way you stand out and never get forgotten.

4: Stay in touch. Ask lots of questions, listen, find commonalities,take notes and follow up. Share specific content with specific people. Make sharing personal not broadcast. Find ways to follow up and stay on the radar.

5: Use karma to your advantage. If you do good things, good things happen to you. Human beings are wired to reciprocate. People in your posse are waiting for an opportunity to return favors. think of your network as a bank and make investments of goodwill, and it will come back. don’t just help those who can obviously help you.

6: Invest in connecting. Build your network when you don’t need it, because crisis building rarely works. When the posse is in place, help is on hand when you need it, whether that is advice, connections or anything else. You get what you have invested in.

These guys are geniuses. Talent Anarchy make sense of my network. You can get a copy of the book Social Gravity. It is going to be my Bible.

Bill

Talent Anarchy

2:

New interactive career site from Barclays

My friend Andy Hyatt of Bernard Hodes sent me over a link today to a new career site from Barclays that he has been working on with his team. After #truLondon I blogged about the Barclays future leaders career site and social hub, and the results were achieving since integrating social features and channels in to their career site. The big take away from that post was that since switching on the social features in the social hub the number of applications received were significantly down, but the conversion rates of applications were significantly up. As a reminder, this is the important data:

> The visitors that interact with The Hub,  have also proven to be more engaged with the site – proving that social content can attract and retain visitors over paid advertising: they are more likely to stay after viewing the first page (15.9% bounce rate vs. 25.8%), stay for longer on the site (9’ vs. 3’51”), and view, on average, twice as many pages per visit (10.05 vs. 5.01).

> Visits to the site have increased by 51%, applications have decreased by 40% over last year. At first this might seem worrying if not for the fact that the conversion rate between assessment and hire increased by 55%. Ultimate proof that targeted and relevant content can deliver better quality candidates who are also more likely to get hired.

It’s interesting to draw parallels between the results Barclays have achieved here, and the work of Michael Long at Rackspace in the States. Rackspace has gone as far as separating out  their career site and a culture site featuring staff bloggers, video, pictures, a cartoonist and plenty of other great culture content, and it’s all very social. I posted about this after seeing Long speak at #TalentNetLive in Austin. The results Long has been achieving:

> The Rackertalent site attracted 37% of the traffic to the career site and ATS, but an incredible 60% of total hires

Looking at the results from these 2 examples, it’s easy to see how taking a social approach to the career site, focussing on culture content told by real employees is not about delivering volumes of applications, (the opposite is in fact the case), but great improvements in the quality of applications and recruiter efficiency. Given the results of the Barclays Future Leaders social hub, it’s no surprise that Barclays have chosen to take this approach to all their recruiting effort visible in the career site launched last week.

Not surprisingly, the site is fully optimised for mobile through a browser sniffer that identifies what device all visitors are using and delivers content in a compatible format. This shouldn’t really be exceptional, all sites should be built this way, though for the moment it is in the minority. If your planning a new site, this is where you should start in your tech plan. The other notable features is that the site is very easy to navigate with unambiguous tabs, and that all sections are interactive. The visitors can engage with each section as little or as much as they want to.

The home page has a welcome message and image. the top tabs are Home, Our Business Areas, Meet Our People, Our Locations and More About Joining. At the bottom of the page is 4 larger widgets. Start job search with the options to choose job sector with a pull down menu, Role and Location, which links direct to job search results. The results are returned with job title, opening paragraph of the job spec and location, with the option to view the job. Jobs are displayed on a single page with displayed by:

> Job Title

> Business Area

> Hours

> Shift Type

> Posting Date

> Expiry Date

>Reference

>Introduction

>”What you’ll give our customers” related to the role

> “What you’ll get in return.”

> “What you’ll need.”

The bottom of the page has 3 tabs with the option to: Apply now, Send this job to a friend and Send this job to yourself. i couldn’t quite work out how to get the last 2 tabs to work, although they appear to be e-mail functions. I’m sure this is a glitch that will be fixed quickly. I like the way the jobs are broken down and presented for the visitor. It’s worth a look for good content.

The second button and icon is “Take an interactive tour.” I love the way this feature works. you get the choice to take a tour around a branch or a contact centre. Taking the Branch tour, you get a video greeting from the Branch Manager who walks you through the branch and introduces you to some of the staff. The interactive bit is very neat. Each person featured has a “hot spot” (a blue dot) you can click on to get more information about what they do. As you’d expect, the video is professionally produced, but the people are clearly real and not scripted, and it’s spontaneous enough to be believable. each featured tells a bit about their story, background, what they do and what they like about their job, and the beauty of it is that the visitor chooses what they want to see.

The third icon and button is headed “Explore our business areas.” The opening page has scrolling images for each of the 12 business areas to link to, a brief description and associated image. The bottom of the page has links to search the jobs in that area, with clear images of real people. The icons featured link to pages on apprenticeships, location map, the interactive tour, and another great feature on culture fit. I really like the way the links to the different sections of the site are featured by scrolling icon on every page, without being intrusive. The changing images stay solid long enough not to be distracting and to be readable, but not too long to be fixed or boring. they also don’t dominate the page, but are big enough to read.When you click on a link, the page opens in a separate single screen with a close option at the top of the page that takes you back to where you linked from. Your not likely to get lost on this site.

I mentioned the culture fit as being a great feature because this links to a screen featuring an ATM that has a welcolme screen talking about values in a simple statement. Entering the ATM, first up is 100% energy. The “game” involves reading scenarios, and choosing answers of what you’d do from 4 options, each denoted by an ATM button.

The first scenario:

” It’s nearly the end of your shift and a new customer calls to open a bank account. They explain they are starting a new job tomorrow and need an account to receive their salary.”

I deliberately clicked on the wrong answer to see what came back, and the response was;

“Whilst this is a good answer, we pride ourselves on our colleagues working flexibly to meet our customers needs.”

The right answer brought the response:

“Excellent. We are looking for people like you, who are willing to work flexibly to meet our customers needs.”

This is a simple example, they take a bit more thinking the further you go. Again, I like the interactivity of this feature which will appeal to those who enjoy gaming features. It’s a lot more interesting and interactive than just listing values brochure style.

The last icon and button is “Meet our people.” which links to an intro page with 24 pin images of people. Hover your mouse over each one and you get their name and title. each image has a different type of content from video, static (written text), and a day in the life. The statics are a picture, intro, and personal content using “I” rather than we, talking about what they do and personal impressions about Barclays like ” I didn’t realise how passionate Barclays are about training and development”, which goes on to show what this means in their experience. it reads in a personal way that will appeal to those who like text. The day in a life video names the employee, who then talks through their usual day and images and dialogue about how they see their job. The videos are about a minute in length to keep attention, with links to read more about the role, read the transcript from the film and use the job search widget to find the job and see whats available. If I’m being ultra critical, I’d like to be able to see and apply for the job featured without having to search for it myself, although it’s not a great hardship, an direct link though would certainly work better with mobile visitors in mind. A feature that compensates for this however is additional links to find people by business area, role or media. Using the different types of media is giving the visitor choice over the style of content they view. I really like that.

The “About Us” tab follows the same theme with an intro and image, the 4 icons I’ve already discussed, history in 5 paragraphs (no waffle), and similar tabs for culture, benefits (which includes their double your donation charity support), and development.

The “Our business areas” tab gives a more detailed menu of each of the business areas broken down in to more specific functions. Not heavy content, but great for visitors who want to get inside the content a bit more.  Finally, the “more about joining” tab gives step by step detail about the application process. Step one is a few tips about the application process with instructions, details about the assessment process like how long each step usually takes, as well as format and tips. Step three details the interview process and what Barclays are looking for. Step four outlines the security, running credit checks, the validating reference process and going trough an extensive background check performed by services like these. I think this is a great feature for supporting the candidate through the whole of the process. Application is through Taleo, so you can apply on-line or add to a job basket for later reference. The application process in Taleo is a bit cumbersome without a social sign in or apply with LinkedIn feature. This might be an area Barclays want to give some consideration to in order to give some continuity between the site and the application process, particularly by mobile. I’m sure at this stage most candidates will plough on so the impact will be minimal, but it would help improve the candidate experience further.

When I compare the new site to the future leaders site, it feels and looks a bit more corporate. I understand that Barclays are moving to putting all their sites, not just careers in to one format, look and feel. Given that this site is for all candidates from apprentices and school leavers through to senior managers, i can see the need for this. There are less social features like Facebook content widgets, but this is compensated by links to the live Facebook, Twitter, YouTube and LinkedIn accounts. These are active accounts with a focus on engagement, so the social aspects are not far away. The videos are a little more consistent and polished in style, but the content and presentation is personal. Overall, I think they’ve done a great job particularly in integrating mobile, simple navigation and interactive features. You can feel the culture and values throughout the site. Hats off to Bernard Hodes and Barclays on a great job.

Bill

Links

Jobs.Barclays.Co.UK

Andy Hyatt

What do Google do with hangouts? #SocialRecruiting

I was sent a link this week from @JeffreyTMoore, about how Google students have started broadcasting live hang outs on Google+. Jeff is a lead recruiter for the engineering team on the East Coast, for Google. I got to spend some time with him when he came to #truBoston, when we were trying to work out how the new channel Google+ might work for recruiting. Whilst being able to segment followers in to circles, it was the concept of hang outs that we got most excited about.
Jump forward 6 months, as the channel is starting to take shape, and Jeff has launched a weekly broadcast to connect with the students who could form the future in-take. Students leave questions on the moderation page, and Jeff acts as host posing the questions for the Google students to answer. As well as students, Moore has hosted hangouts for recruiters to advise job seekers in areas like technical interviews and resume writing, as well as Engineers in Google The hangouts are recorded and posted to YouTube, where they are attracting additional views.
The first company to really use students, live broadcast and U-Stream and Facebook was Deloitte Grads in NZ. This was new, and innovative, and led to some great results, both in terms of hiring and candidate perception. Combined with other social media activity, Deloitte became cool. The project was led by head of recruiting in New Zealand, Richard Long, and was put together by Consultant and Community DJ, Paul Jacobs.(No stranger to #tru or this blog.). Google+ hangouts are an extension of this. They have a different feel, more like a broadcast Skype call, that I’m sure will resonate with viewers. Google+ also enables multiple contributors in different locations to take part. Viewers can join the circles behind the hang out, in order to connect with Google recruiters, or the employees who have appeared in the broadcast. Unlike Livestream or similar products, it’s also free to use.

Since the introduction of branded pages, the potential to combine hang outs with other Google+ features has really opened up. Find people on + is now incorporated in to the main interface, making searching and sourcing easy. This makes messaging invites to join a hang out a great option, then inviting the viewers in to a dedicated circle, where you can continue to share targeted content. Because it’s a new channel, there’s also no conflict with personal/business space as with Facebook. I’m now coming round to the prospect of Google+ as a recruiting channel, and I’m sure the developers are working on new apps that will make this even easier.

If Google can do it, why can’t you?

Bill

BTW: Heres the Google+ Students Page , there’s over 42,000 connections, and a few of the episodes:

Deloitte Grads

Jefferey T Moore

Breaking News: Keith Potts announces Evenbase. A new global name in digital recruitment.

Jobsite founder Keith Potts  today announced the launch of new digital recruitment group “Evenbase”.  Potts,  takes the helm as Chief Executive Officer of the new business, which sees new responsibilities for key personnel in the team.

This is a bold but logical move to formally combine the complimenting services offered by the companies in the group, and provide a springboard for growth globally. The plan for Evenbase was formulated during a 4 month strategy project in 2010, with much of 2011 getting all the pieces and personnel in place during 2011. Speaking to Potts, he is clearly excited by this next stage of growth, whose roots lie in a porta-cabin in Portsmouth. It’s clear in what he says that despite the success of the business, his biggest pride is in the team he has built around him during this time.

For Potts, Evenbase means the day-to-day focus moves from operational to strategic.Potts puts much of the success of the business down to people, and that they have been able to retain the entrepreneurial  characters within the business, and this has impacted on the group. It’s the people who are at the heart of everything, and it’s the people who will continue to move the business forward. They have assembled an enviable team. The purpose of the Group is explained on the newly unveiled website:

“Evenbase is a global digital recruitment group. We discover and develop intelligent recruitment services that revolutionise the matching of talent with opportunity.”

The Evenbase portfolio contains market leading digital recruitment assets including Oilcareers, Jobsite and 10 other niche, generalist and vertical sector job boards, the leading multi-poster and unified search provider Broadbean, and technology partnerships including NHS Jobs, Northcliffe Media and Johnston Press. The structure of the business sees the formation of a central group executive, with four business units, each headed by a Managing Director and shares a vision to revolutionise how candidates find work and how companies source and hire candidates domestically and globally. Keith Potts, Evenbase Chief Executive Officer, says; “Today’s announcement is a significant milestone in the group’s maturity as a business.

Potts continues; “We’ve come a long way from a family start-up as Jobsite.co.uk, to the group of market leading brands and 330 employees we have today. It’s not surprising that our ambitions outgrew our structure and operating model along the way. Although many of our brands are already operating on the international stage, we see a far greater potential for Evenbase given the synergies of our portfolio as a whole.”

I see this as an exciting progression for each of the individual business. I see the 5 big factors in recruiting forward are:

> Collaborative technologies

> Data mining and analysis

> Local focus, global reach

>Innovation

> Ease of operation and interaction

There is no doubt that with a unified approach between the brands, on and off-line presents a powerful force in the market place, and ticks all these boxes. Whilst being big names in their own right, each of the individual brands have had a largely domestic focus until recent years, that said, they have by no means been parochial in outlook. The accumulated expertise across traditional media, on-line media and job distribution places them in a unique position for growth globally. Jobsite currently power all the on-line job advertising for 55 local newspapers, and reach 60% of domestic households in the U.K. The job board business has quietly launched brands in 5 countries, and Broadbean now service 65 countries with a growing operation in Newport Beach in Orange County, USA, employing 25 people in a relatively short space of time. Over the last few years, Broadbean have been switching their product offering from essentially agency focussed, to the corporate market, numbering some significant global brands in their portfolio. The NHS are the second largest employer in the world, and it is the Jobsite portal that powers all of the NHS jobs. There collective scale has perhaps been hidden till now, behind the individual brands. I know Keith, Felix Wetzel, Strategy development Director and Broadbean founder and CEO Kelly Robinson well from their involvment and support of #tru events. The candidate is always at the heart of their business approach, and I’m confident that Evenbase, with Potts at the helm will retain this focus, and that is good news for candidates globally. I’ve been impressed by how Jobsite and Broadbean have been using the “Big Data” available to them to develop their capabilities in data analysis and predictive user functions. I’m sure this will feature in new offerings from the group. Evenbase will have 4 key areas of operation:

1. Job boards: Focusing on the delivery of superior service and solutions across the portfolio’s generalist, niche and vertical market job board brands

2. Business Solutions: Providing award-winning, scalable job board and recruitment software services to the Public and Private sectors

3. New ventures: Focused on the international expansion of key group assets and roll out of new business models and initiatives.

4. Recruitment software: Providing recruitment software solutions for multi-posting, CV search, candidate matching and reporting tools Keith Potts added “Evenbase gives us a solid foundation for both international expansion and the fulfilling of opportunities not only for our brands but also for our clients, partners and candidates. Day to-day business will continue as normal for brands within the portfolio, while the Evenbase executive team will focus on our ambition to become a truly global digital recruitment group within three years.”

The Evenbase Executive team consists of: – Keith Potts, Chief Executive Officer – Damian McCallion, Chief Operating Officer – Felix Wetzel, Strategy Development Director – Graham Potts, Group IT Director – Mike Wall, Managing Director – Job boards – Heather Wozniak, Managing Director – Business solutions – Ray Duggins, Managing Director – New ventures – Kelly Robinson, Chief Executive – Broadbean – Dan Martin, Managing Director – Broadbean This is big news in the industry, and I’m delighted in particular for Keith, Kelly and Felix, proof that good guys need not necessarily come second. While this is a great move for the businesses that form Evenbase, I’m confident that it will be good news for candidates and companies alike, and expect to see some exciting innovations emerge from these collaborations. I wish Keith,Felix, Kelly and all the team the very best for the future. I’m expecting great things,with plenty of innovation.

Bill

LINKS Evenbase.Com

#TruLondon 5: You wouldn’t want to miss it!

The plans for #TruLondon are coming together, in what promises to be the best event yet. #TruLondon takes place on the 22′nd – 23′rd Feb, at The City Hotel, E1.  Their’s 40 track leaders lined up, coming from around the globe including South Africa, America and right across Europe. Participants are already booked from 12 countries. There’s plenty of new conversations, livestream, new for 2012 is a live lab that is going to feature a surprise hack to be announced on the day, the #TruGrads, a minimum of 6 case study’s and much more. We’ve also teamed up again with Rob Van Elburg and #RIDE for “The Recruitment Industry Dance Event,” on the 22′nd. There’s something for everyone in the tracks, with track leaders from Corporate and Agency Recruiting, H.R, Learning and Development, Technology, Digital Media, Job Boards and more. 36 tracks. No presentations. No powerpoint.
Check out the faces of the track leaders:

Theres only 30 tickets left. You wouldn’t want to miss out!

Book Tickets Now By Clicking On The Image

#TruLondon 5: You wouldn't want to miss it!

The plans for #TruLondon are coming together, in what promises to be the best event yet. #TruLondon takes place on the 22′nd – 23′rd Feb, at The City Hotel, E1.  Their’s 40 track leaders lined up, coming from around the globe including South Africa, America and right across Europe. Participants are already booked from 12 countries. There’s plenty of new conversations, livestream, new for 2012 is a live lab that is going to feature a surprise hack to be announced on the day, the #TruGrads, a minimum of 6 case study’s and much more. We’ve also teamed up again with Rob Van Elburg and #RIDE for “The Recruitment Industry Dance Event,” on the 22′nd. There’s something for everyone in the tracks, with track leaders from Corporate and Agency Recruiting, H.R, Learning and Development, Technology, Digital Media, Job Boards and more. 36 tracks. No presentations. No powerpoint.
Check out the faces of the track leaders:

Theres only 30 tickets left. You wouldn’t want to miss out!

Book Tickets Now By Clicking On The Image

Sunday Shout Out: That's #Andsome #SocialRecruiting

About a year ago I was interviewed by John Sumser as part of his influencer series. John asked me who I was influenced by, and was a bit surprised (not by his inclusion, but because Mark was less well known across the water,) when I gave this answer:

“4: Mark Rice – Andsome People.

A recent one for me. Mark has been running multiple social recruiting campaigns with real results. These are quite different (and I’d say above all simple) in approach. I have only noticed his work over the last 9 months, and he shared real case studies at #trulondon. I think his work rivals most others in this field anywhere.”

I first came across Mark via Twitter and the #Andsome hashtag. where he has been a daily contributor to the #SocialRecruiting hashtag. He has a sharp wit, which he is not afraid to share, and an opinion on most things from gaming through to employer branding and on-boarding.

Marks career, prior to co- founding Andsome People in 1998,  includes 2 years at Bernard Hodes as Creative Director, a year as Head of Art at MacMillian Davis and 2 years at Barkers as Art Director/Creative Group Head, his first post in the world of recruitment advertising.

I heard more about Marks work at #truLondon a year ago. Mark shared two brilliant story’s about social recruiting working with I.T.V. for script-writers and runners, and with Paul’s the Bakers for Managers and other staff. I think it was the Paul’s story that first made me realise that social recruiting didn’t necessarily mean on-line recruiting, it’s more of an approach and mind-set. I now incorporate much  of this thinking in to my work integrating social recruiting, and I always think, “What would Andsome do?”

The I.T.V. story was a recruiting project, firstly to hire script writers, but not from the usual places. The long running soap Coronation Street wanted to introduce new blood. Rice created Facebook groups to suggest story lines and how episodes could finish. He ran a competition to identify the best talent, and they hired from this pool.

To hire runners Andsome created and managed a twitter account, tweeting in to the hashtag streams of popular programs, with a link to an interactive page with the opportunity to apply. The work was simple, but brilliant, built around engagement, but more importantly got results.

The Paul’s campaign was different, but no less effective. Mystery shoppers were sent out to competitor establishments to spot those staff that offered exceptional customer service, in line with Paul’s own values. Once identified they were presented with a card thanking them, with a message added in invisible ink that was revealed when added to heat, with an invitation to connect. It was different, and it worked!

The Andsome Avatar

Since their inception, Andsome People have won awards in recognition of excellent work in social recruiting. Last week, at the RAD Awards, Andsome won in no less than five categories, for their continued excellent work with I.T.V. and restaurant chain ZiZi. Most notably, they won an award for a social recruiting campaign in a non-social recruiting category, taking social in to the mainstream. You can read the story of these campaigns (and others), in a five-part series on the Andsome Blog, linked at the end of this post.

This video (stolen from Apple) is my shout out for Mark Rice and Andsome People:

Today’s post and the first of my Sunday Shout Outs, is in recognition of the excellent work Andsome have done to prove that social recruiting need not be complicated, All of the featured campaigns took plenty of hours to deliver the engagement needed to make them work. A level of engagement that is only possible in the social channels, and mostly delivered out of hours. I’m hoping we can get Mark back to #TruLondon on Feb 22′nd – 23′rd to share more of these story’s. They are after all, only around the corner, so come on Mark, come and share.

I know that Mark Rice and Andsome will not be a stranger to most of the U.K. readers of this blog, but for anyone not familiar with them, be sure to check them out.

Bill

Links

The Andsome Blog

Andsome People

Mark Rice

ITV Experience

ZiZi Talent (Look at this one!)

The RAD’s Winners

John Sumser’s Influencer Project Interview