Twitter

Tincup asks about Twitter

I recently hosted a hangout on being a Twitter stalker (Recruiter Edition.) for Colleague. My friend William Tincup posted some questions to answer in the session, but I didn’t get a chance to answer them all. They are great questions, so here goes:

- Can you / should you use Twitter Ads to source / brand?

Twitter ads and promoted tweets are very effective for drviing traffic, but have the highest bounce rate. Twitter has the most curious clickers, who go to look at something because it is vaguely interesting, only to discover it is not what they thought. Twitter is largely for down time browsers, and about 90% on mobile. Ads are effective provided you consider:

Where you are taking people, and if possible keep them in channel

A destination that is a clear, simple landing page, built for mobile, with a very easy call to action. You need to view this on twitter/tweetdeck to test it, on an i-phone or mobile device.

Any call to action or sign up needs to be one click, enabling a twitter sign in.

Content needs to be very relevant with a clear message

Links in the middle of a tweet get 5 times more clicks. Don’t know why but they do. I have tested this many times.
- Your thoughts on protected accounts…,

Its like going to a networking event in disguise. Private is for e-mail, and nothing is secret. If I want to see your protected tweets, I can, and it is never that interesting. No one is that exciting that I’m going to follow them just to see their tweets. get a life.
- Language translation via Twitter… thoughts on sourcing in a different language…

Normal users tweet in their own language. You want to find them, you need to search in the native language for the geekwords. You want to find people in conversation, because that is how you identify them. Not by their bios.Google and twitter translate is a different language, just not the one you are looking for!

– Links out… should folks link to a LinkedIn, Facebook, Instagram account?

Link to where you want people to connect, and the landing place you want people to see. No point linking to the default twitter, because you were already found there. Some directory apps like Twollow will automaticaly change your bio to that destination. Check this and change it back to where you want them to go.

– If someone is looking for a job, should they list that in their Twitter bio?

Is this a real question? If you are in a job, you probably want to keep it a secret, though you need to make sure you are easy to find in search by skills, employer and job. Thats what recruiters search for on the whole, and is rarely in a bio when you are not looking. If you are out of work, every social profile should state what you are looking for, and link to an on-line resume. The advice that you look desperate is BS. You probably are desperate, and hungry. People respect the pro-active. You are not in transition, you are out of work!

– How important are Twitter chats for finding talent?

Only if you are hiring recruiters, consultants or vendors. # streams around events  that are industry specific, prove far more useful, along with searching for industry terms in tweets.

– Should folks have the same profile pic in Twitter as they have in LinkedIn?

I do, because I think recognition is important, and your picture should stand out in some way. I wear a yellow shirt, because you can easily spot me. I don’t buy in to the big head, face thing, because those avatars look like politicians, and everyone hates politicians.Deffinitely don’t put your chin on your hand or you will look slimey.

 Can you source Twitter IDs from LinkedIn (and/or Facebook)?

40% of LinkedIn profiles have a Twitter name, and 35% of Facebook profiles. If people don’t know you they are far more likely to engage with you on Twitter than either of the other channels. Twitter was built for talking to strangers, and it is where most on-line relationships start. Sourcing from LinkedIn to build a twitter list will give your lists relevance. This is important.

– Thoughts on unfollowing folks that don’t follow you back…

Petulant and stupid. Follow people who interest you. Lists are far more important than followers/following because you can segment content, people and conversations by group, embeding lists in to the columns in tweetdeck or hootsuite.Only unfollow people who spam you or are annoying. I worry about my followers not my unfollowers. If I unfollow you, please don’t message me to ask why.

– Thoughts on favouriting tweets… good practice, best practice and/or bad idea?

If it is your favourite, why not, it gives that tweet greater visibility. favouriting someones tweet also gets you noticed by them. Don’t, however, favourite your own tweet, or people saying good things about you, because you look like a C+ck.

Favouriting tweets says a lot about your interests, similar to likes on Facebook. The real benefit though is that your favourite, retweeted tweets or opened links helps Twitter to build a profile of who you are, along with your Klout topic word cloud. This drives the recommended follow engine in Twitter, that suggests you to new users, or to people with similar interests. What you share, open and favourite will shape your potential following, that’s why recruiters mostly get followed by recruiters.

Thanks for your questions William. Any others from anyone fire them in. If you don’t follow @WilliamTincup, put him on your list.

Bill

You can view the hangout HERE

Thank you Twitter!

I got a tweet today that got me thinking and reminiscing. I’ve had a Twitter account for 4 years today.

 

My first tweet was: “Can anyone see this?”. The answer was yes, but just the first person I followed. When I started tweeting, I didn’t really have any expectation. I had heard Radio One DJ Chris Moyles talking about Twitter, and figured that it was worth giving it a go. I had around 100 LinkedIn connections and a LinkedIn group. That was the extent of my social media activity. I was an old school recruiter. What could get out of Twitter with just 140 characters to use? At first it just looked like a lot of noise, and I was making most of it. People talking about Sandwiches, Matt Alder complaining about things, motivational quotes from dead people, motivational quotes from alive people. What would ever come from “wasting” my time taking part?

For a newcomer it was pretty confusing. Lots of advice, rules and twitter etiquette from people who had a whole 6 months experience, about how many tweets a day I should post, how often I should retweet, who to follow, to be transparent (but not say what I really thought because that would be bad for brand) etc etc. Before that day I had never thought of myself as a brand, I still don’t really. I decided to listen to all this sage advice, and do the exact opposite. I don’t really like convention. If you read my blog, you might know that.

I was in a bad place back then. I’d just closed my training business and had no work. I had time on my hands, and too much of it, and so I started. I could pretend to everyone (including myself) that I was busy, and so I just started tweeting. 100+ tweets a day, retweeting incessantly, in 4 years I have sent out 56,825 tweets to date, 30,000 in the first 18 months, and I connected with everyone. No real strategy or objective, no targets or anything else. I loved this new medium and the conversations I was having and I made lots of friends and got noticed and connected quickly.

What I klike best about Twitter is that I can find the conversations I want or have an interest in and I can join in. I can connect and speak to whoever I want. I don’t need an invitation or to ask permission. That is what was different about Twitter, and I’ve just kept connecting, talking, listening and identifying what I might be able to offer my network commercially, and the places I might be able to contribute.

I don’t know where I would be now or what I would be doing if I hadn’t sent that first tweet. I’ve learnt more from links I’ve seen and connections I’ve made over the last 4 years than I have in the other 42 years of my life. I’ve made many good friends, some of whom I’ve met. I no longer believe you need to meet people in person to be friends, that is an old way of looking at the world. I’ve built a global event business on a hashtag with #tru. I’ve spoken at, hosted or attended over 100 events on 4 continents. I know being social in approach and thinking works. I’m living proof of R.O.I. I’ve worked with companies like the BBC, Oracle and Hard Rock Cafe integrating social recruiting. I work with great recruitment product companies like RolePoint, Joberate and Colleague. I get paid to write content, whitepapers and even a book. I hope I give back some value when people need it. I could never give back as much as I’ve taken out, and it all started with one tweet:

Can anyone see this?

Bill

 

Visibility: The new influence (or why Klout is important)

Contrary to the popular myth, content is not king. It is important, yes, but not as important as found content. If I don’t see what you are posting, then you have no opportunity to influence me or change my thinking. The way the social media channels work now, I’m more likely not to see your content than to see it, and that changes things.
Whilst I appreciate what they have been trying to achieve, I’ve always taken my Klout score with a pinch of salt. My Klout score has always been a direct relation to the volume of updates I have been pushing out. Since I moved my principle channel from Twitter to Facebook, my score has dropped considerably, but have I become any more or less influential? I consider my real influence comes through my blog or the #tru events that I host around the world, and Klout doesn’t really factor this in, although my mentions might go up as a result.
Although the actual algorithm is shrouded in a bit of mystery, the guide to Klout lists the signals they use to calculate your score as follows:

Facebook
Mentions: A mention of your name in a post indicates an effort to engage with you directly.
Likes: The simplest action that shows engagement with the content you create.
Comments: As a reaction to content you share, comments also reflect direct engagement by your network.
Subscribers: Subscriber count is a more persistent measure of influence that grows over time.
Wall Posts: Posts to your wall indicate both influence and engagement.
Friends: Friend count measures the reach of your network but is less important than how your network engages with your content.
Twitter
Retweets: Retweets increase your influence by exposing your content to extended follower networks.
Mentions: People seeking your attention by mentioning you is a strong signal of influence. We also take into account the differences in types of mentions, including “via” and “cc.”
List Memberships: Being included on lists curated by other users demonstrates your areas of influence.
Followers: Follower count is one factor in your Score, but we heavily favor engagement over size of audience.
Replies: Replies show that you are consistently engaging your network with quality content.
Google+
Comments: As a reaction to content you share, comments also reflect direct engagement by your network.
+1’s: The simplest action that shows engagement with the content you create.
Reshares: Reshares increase your influence by exposing your content to extended networks on Google+.
LinkedIn
Title: Your reported title on LinkedIn is a signal of your real-world influence and is persistent.
Connections: Your connection graph helps validate your real-world influence.
Recommenders: The recommenders in your network add additional signals to the contribution LinkedIn makes to your Score.
Comments: As a reaction to content you share, comments also reflect direct engagement by your network.

The important thing here is the emphasis on unique interaction and subscriptions in all of the channels, and your ratio of interactions to follower/friend/connection count. This is critical because edgerank (and whatever name LinkedIn and Twitter use to rank content), means that your content is only visible to people who interact with you. This is most evident on Facebook, but is relevant to Twitter and LinkedIn because your updates get pushed right down the stream or feed when there is little interaction. Equally, shares, likes and comments combined with authorship on Google+ will increase your ranking in personal search results amongst your social connections. Whichever way you look at it, interaction means visibility, and visibility presents the opportunity to influence.

Personally, I place the greatest importance on LinkedIn interactions, because my LinkedIn network has the greatest relevance to the areas I work in, and there is less interaction in this channel. I have calculated the relevance of my LinkedIn network at 70%, where as Facebook is closer to 45% (with a smaller network), and Twitter at close to 30%. (with my biggest network.). Whilst it seems Klout ranks all channels equally, your Klout score is a good indicator of interactions, hence visibility. If your not getting visibility, then you need to either reconsider how to get interaction from your updates by inviting comment or asking questions, or consider paying to promote your updates or tweets, which makes them visible to larger sections of your network. Whilst LinkedIn don’t yet offer “promoted” updates, I’m sure the facility won’t be too far away. It might well also be time to take more than a passing interest in your Klout score.

Bill

You can read the full guide to Klout scores HERE

 

Twitter trends just got personal

There’s a new feature on twitter that I think is quite neat. On the twitter screen you can access trends by clicking on the #discover tab. Before Wednesday this gave you the global trends from twitter. You got to see the tweets, links, videos and pictures that were being most shared. This was quite interesting for amusement, but had little real value other than curiosity. You can usually predict what is going to be trending globally by what gets featured in the news or current affairs.This week that all changed.
Twitter have switched trends to a personalised version based on your location and your own following and followers. This is a really useful feature for recruiters in my opinion, because it makes it easy to stay current, and to join topical conversations.  This is also a great way to identify who is influencing or starting the trends, as the most shared are listed at the top of the list as the top tweets. With trends being based on your personal network, you can see what events or twitter chats are attracting your target audience.

I’ve blogged in the past about setting up different accounts according to the disciplines you hire for by searching for geek words in either Twitter search or SocialBro and following the people you find, and sharing targeted content on these accounts. The added benefit of doing this now is that you can also pick up the trends and popular content in your target market. This also means you can spot and share the content that you know is already appealing to your target audience, and this is going to bring following.

Twitter understand that you may not want this new feature, so they have given the option to reset the default to global trends, or to toggle between the two, all you need to do is click on the change tab. This is another reason I’m moving from Tweetdeck and back to Twitter.com. I get all the features I need in the one place.

Bill


I’M HOSTING #HRCARNIVAL ON THE 20′TH OF JUNE. I’M KEEPING IT SIMPLE. NO THEME, AND A #SHRM2012 EXTRA. IF YOU WANT YOUR BLOG FEATURED SEND ME A LINK TO YOUR FAVOURITE POST. bill@billboorman.co.uk BY SUNDAY.

Why I'm quitting Twitter, and where I'm going.

Over the last few months I have found myself spending an increasing amount of time in a new channel that combines many of the aspects of Twitter, Facebook and LinkedIn. Having tested third life, which is an extension of role-playing channel second life, I’m convinced that this personalised experience is the way forward for recruiting.
The technology is pretty amazing. You use your webcam to upload your avatar, and your avatar delivers messages via a hologram image. The really funky bit is when you view the image on an i-phone, i-pad or similar device, which delivers the message using augmented reality to put the messenger right in front of you in 3-D. Sounds like Dr.Who or Startreck, but think about the applications.
I’ve been lucky enough to have a Beta version for the last 4 months, and to take part in tests and trials. Last week I conducted an augmented reality interview, in which I was able position my hologram with another one and conduct a virtual interview, By using pressure pads similar to those built for X-Box Kinect, I was able to have a virtual handshake, and could maintain eye contact. It was as good as the real thing. You can conduct tests, even use a polygraph feature to determine if the answers you are getting to your questions are correct. It might even be worth using the tech for in person interviews using this feature alone.It has to be a winner.

I’ve also been playing around with the virtual meet up function, with #tru in mind. I’m hoping that we will be able to use third life to host the first augmented reality unconference. You will be able to see, talk and “sit” with the other participants, argue and contribute through your hologram and enjoy the whole unconference experience in person without leaving your home. It’s going to be wild!

I’ve enjoyed third life so much that the other one-dimensional channels have got a bit dull for me now. I’m also convinced that the real life in person interaction will become THE social network in a very short space of time, and as we have seen with Twitter, Facebook and Google+, it’s the early adopters who end up dominating the channel as new users come on board. As of 11.59 today I will be disabling my Twitter account. It’s been a lot of fun sending 51,000 tweets, but it is time for something new to take over, and third life will be the next big thing. You can all join me by clicking on the third life link below. Farewell Twitter, it’s been fun!

Bill

LINKS

Get a look at Third Life

Why I’m quitting Twitter, and where I’m going.

Over the last few months I have found myself spending an increasing amount of time in a new channel that combines many of the aspects of Twitter, Facebook and LinkedIn. Having tested third life, which is an extension of role-playing channel second life, I’m convinced that this personalised experience is the way forward for recruiting.
The technology is pretty amazing. You use your webcam to upload your avatar, and your avatar delivers messages via a hologram image. The really funky bit is when you view the image on an i-phone, i-pad or similar device, which delivers the message using augmented reality to put the messenger right in front of you in 3-D. Sounds like Dr.Who or Startreck, but think about the applications.
I’ve been lucky enough to have a Beta version for the last 4 months, and to take part in tests and trials. Last week I conducted an augmented reality interview, in which I was able position my hologram with another one and conduct a virtual interview, By using pressure pads similar to those built for X-Box Kinect, I was able to have a virtual handshake, and could maintain eye contact. It was as good as the real thing. You can conduct tests, even use a polygraph feature to determine if the answers you are getting to your questions are correct. It might even be worth using the tech for in person interviews using this feature alone.It has to be a winner.

I’ve also been playing around with the virtual meet up function, with #tru in mind. I’m hoping that we will be able to use third life to host the first augmented reality unconference. You will be able to see, talk and “sit” with the other participants, argue and contribute through your hologram and enjoy the whole unconference experience in person without leaving your home. It’s going to be wild!

I’ve enjoyed third life so much that the other one-dimensional channels have got a bit dull for me now. I’m also convinced that the real life in person interaction will become THE social network in a very short space of time, and as we have seen with Twitter, Facebook and Google+, it’s the early adopters who end up dominating the channel as new users come on board. As of 11.59 today I will be disabling my Twitter account. It’s been a lot of fun sending 51,000 tweets, but it is time for something new to take over, and third life will be the next big thing. You can all join me by clicking on the third life link below. Farewell Twitter, it’s been fun!

Bill

LINKS

Get a look at Third Life

#Hatemyboss #Hatemyjob Warning: Contains real tweets

In researching this post I conducted a simple search in my twitter timeline, for people posting using the hashtag #hatemyjob and #hatemyboss.The following are real tweets from this search. I’ve not embedded the tweets to protect the stupid from themselves, but I promise you these are real. Try the search out for yourself!

WARNING: THE FOLLOWING TWEETS CONTAIN OFFENSIVE LANGUAGE, NOT FOR THE EASILY SHOCKED:

#hatemyjob

Hungover drums just sound awful. #hatemyjob

I don’t see why people aren’t interested in a boring cold call from me to do a shit survey about a load of crap #answerthephone #hatemyjob

Hate going to work when the suns out especially 10-6 #hatemyjob” girlllllllll do not get me started Haha

Off to the hell hole I go … #hatemyjob

Can’t be arsed today! #HateMyJob

Today wasn’t nice. We should just skip from Sunday to Tuesday. Or just straight to Saturday!! #hatemyjob

OHKAY COOL, don’t schedule me at all.to work. That’s perfectly fine, knowing that I NEED MONEY. #hatemyjob

Welp back to work tomorrow #hatemyjob

In our work. The faves do what the want when they want. And the rest of us suffer for it #hatemyjob#idontwanttotakeyourorder

I just love going to work and crying everyday! #hatemyjob

woohoo! finally I finished 5 stupid design with very weak computer to the company where I work :s… I’m very comfortable now but #HateMyJob

#Hatemyboss

back to work tomorrow after a week off.. #hatemyboss #FML

so bitter about being at work two hours early on a saturday. #hatemyboss

I seriously hate most of my bosses but 1 #HateMyBoss #WorkProbs

I feel like i’m back to the age of the anxiety #fuckthisshit #hatemyboss

For real? This day is just going down hill now…. #hatemyboss

I cant fucking do my homework when I have down time? are you fucking kidding me. hate to break it to you but school comes first. #hatemyboss

Deff gonna be late to work but then again who cares, #hatemyboss treats me like crap anyways

This is an absolute Piss take! Fuck you Managing director! #cunt #hatemyboss

Hottest day of the year so far + being stuck with my boss for 5 hours = complete and utter torture!!!! #FML #hatemyboss

Work til 3 and I can’t wait for it to be over #hatemyboss

Need to find a new job ASAP!#hatemyboss

I feel like i’m back to the age of the anxiety#fuckthisshit #hatemyboss

Theres always a lot of talk about people getting fired for being critical of their employer, boss or colleagues in the social media channels. In the most part, these storys usually come down to the argument about privacy, monitoring and just what people get fired for. Mostly I find that it is a case of the comments being a symptom of the general breakdown of relationship between employer and employee, and all the tweets or updates really did was give the bullets that enable the company to load the gun and fire. Theres also an argument that these are stupid people who deserve to be fired, after all, most contracts of employment prohibit speaking in a manner that might bring damage to the company.

Another way of looking at it is that these posts indicate  just what these employees think of their bosses and jobs. I don’t think it is just a case of sacking the misguided people behind the tweets and the problem goes away.

There is always going to be the odd rogue employee that needs to have a conversation, but if it is a number of employees tweeting the same things, there’s a work place problem that needs addressing, and the solution won’t be heavy-handed policy or action. Twitter is the messenger for employee sentiment, don’t shoot the messenger, fix the problem. I don’t have the data, but I’m fairly sure that the tweets listed below were mostly made from mobile. No amount of bans on tweeting from work is going to block that, better to work with employees on creating awareness about public platforms.  Education is always a better solution to legislation, and far better for employer reputation, which ultimately results in employer branding.

Employees are being increasingly asked to take part in talent attraction, by sharing jobs and other content in their social networks. The practice of social referral is dependent on this, but what is the likelihood of any of this being effective if your people mix these referrals and posts in with negative comments about their boss or job?

The route to getting a great employer brand is quite simple. BE A GREAT COMPANY! Monitoring employee content is the barometer to employer brand, but you need to consider how you are going to react. If your employees feel so bad about you that they tweet their feelings so openly, your problem isn’t that they are on Facebook or Twitter, and firing them all won’t make the problem go away.

Bill