#trulondon

The #trulondon9 Schedule: Feb 26. Live from London

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Research Sponsor

Drinks Sponsor

Lunch and Award Sponsor

Show and Tell Sponsor

Gold Sponsor

This #trulondon is all change. We’ve tightened things up by making the tracks 40 minutes, we’ve gone back to the City Hotel, which many past participants have called our spiritual home deep in Brick Lane, and we’ve added “show and tell”, to showcase 18 of the most innovative recruiting products from around the world.

Our show and tell sponsors Lumesse are launching a technology ecosystem partnering with the best technology providers from around the world, and this is a great opportunity for the 18 companies taking part to showcase what they have to offer. Our global sponsors Kelly Services will be creating new content throughout the day in the Kelly studio, and lunch sponsors Maximum will be presenting awards for the most engaged career brands on Twitter and Facebook based on their performance over the last 12 months on the Social Recruitment Monitor. Social Referral company RolePoint are the research sponsor for #trulondon, and will be sharing some exclusive research in to Big Data and recruiting on the day. Gold sponsor Stack Overflow will also be sharing research on what developers look for in a brand when making the choice to move. There is a full line up of track leaders from around the world. It is going to be a great event! The #trulondon9 schedule:

The show and tell schedule, situated in the bar.

 

 

 

 

You can buy one of the last 6 tickets HERE

 

 

 

#trulondon 9 – Feb 26’th – All new line up

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After the last #trulondon in September, we made a decision to freshen things up a bit. Not lose any of the excitement and conversation, but give the opportunity for new topics, retain some of the favourites and give hands on access to some of the new technology we talk about. We have a great line up of track leaders and some exciting extras, and we have moved to a one crammed day of content with tracks lasting 40 minutes. As always, dress code is casual, theres no name badges or powerpoint, we’ve added luch (a curry, what else in Brick Lane) and we are back at our favourite venue, the City Hotel. Thanks to our global sponsors Kelly Services for once again making this event possible, and keeping ticket prices affordable. 

Whats new?

> Show and tell tech lab

18 new product sessions with the usual no pitches. 20 minute sessions consisting of 5 minute discussion on need, 10 minute product demo and 5 minutes Q&A. At the end of the sessions participants will answer a simple question with thumbs up and thumbs down, “If you had the need and the budget would you buy it?”
Any company can take part by buying a show and tell ticket priced at £250
Companies taking part include:

> Take the interview from New York – Interview process technology and video
> RolePoint from San Francisco and London – Social referral technology
> Loop from Brighton and San Francisco – Mobile platform for branding and recruitment process
> OnRecruit from Amsterdam – Performance analytics, campaign management for pay per click
> Job and Talent from Madrid and London – Aggregation and matching technology
> PocketRecruit from London – Mobile content and engagement platform
> WorkDigital from London- Unveiling a new product
> Pando from NewYork – Business intelligence platform
> Joberate from Finland – Predictive recruitment analytics and talent pooling
> Maximum employment marketing group from Rotterdam and China – Proxy targeted display advertising

We will be announcing the next 4 participating companies next week, and theres room for 4 more. get a show and tell ticket if you want to take part.

 

> Social Recruiting winners with Maximum and the Social Recruitment Monitor

The Social Recruitment Monitor™ ranks social media recruitment activity for the world’s leading employers. It accurately tracks data for the major social networks, and refreshes weekly so that the ffigures stay up to date. The SRM Index is the overall rankings indicator: it uses a combination of carefully weighted variables that are proven indicators of popularity, activity and interaction – not just the “fan base”.
> Brought to us by sponsors Maximum Employment Marketing Group , tracks will be hosted by the people behind the top performing career brands for the last 12 months according to the index. During lunch Maximum will be presenting recognition awards for the top performers (according to the data) on Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn and YouTube. (and they are paying for lunch!) Real stories from real companies.
> The #CandE companies
The evening of the 25th Feb will be marked by a celebration of the UK candidate experience awards winners for 2013. Companies judged by data collected by their candidates, not the opinion of a panel. It is the most comprehensive benchmarking of candidate experience in the UK.
The #CandE tracks will be hosted by Leigh Carpenter, UK programme director, featuring an opening breakdown of the data by Gerry Crispin and a summary by Elaine Orler, and representatives from 4 of the participating companies sharing what they have done to improve candidate experience during 2012. Real stories with no small talk.


> Tech Recruiting and the tech #SourceLab
Hosted by our tech track sponsors StackOverflow Careers 2.0 European Managing Director Dimitar Stanimiroff, who will be sharing some sourcing secrets from Careers 2.0, and tricks and hacks from:
> Martin Lee – Director of Research and Search at Social Media Search
> Andrea Mitchell – Talent community manager and sourcer at GE/Ochre House
> Shane McCusker – Founder at Intelligence Software
> Matt Burney – Talent acquisition and in-house resourcing strategist at G4S
> Craig Fisher – VP Recruiting, LinkedIn training and social media strategy at Ajax Media


> Kes Thygesen of sponsors RolePoint, the social referral platform, will be hosting the open tracks  with tracks from:
> Kevin Wheeler – Future of Talent Institute
> Danielle Weinblatt – Founder – Take the interview
> Peter Gold – Hire Strategies/HR Mash
> Crystal Miller – Digital Strategist – AT&T
> Peter Cosgrove – CPL
> Michael Beygelman – joberate
> Felix Wetzell – JobRapido
> Rachelle Falls – Sun Strategies
> James Smith – CareersinLuxury
> Steve Ward – Cloud Nine
> Andrew Gadomsky – Aspen Advisors
As an added bonus, theres an opening conversation on culture branding by the global head of marketing at our global sponsors KellyOCG, and a closing conversation on communities from the founder of one of the only real community platforms, StackOverflow.
Coffees are brought to you by our drinks sponsors Colleague.


The whole event is only made possible by our fantastic global sponsors Kelly Services, who have a few surprises lined up for the day, including Kelly TV.
There are only 30 tickets left, and you wouldn’t want to miss this line up!
Bill

CLICK ON IMAGE BELOW TO BUY TICKETS

The end of the in-house recruiter? #DiceTru #TruLondon

Recruitment is changing, there is no doubt about that, but there is a particular trend that seems to be gaining momentum that recruiters should be very conscious of because it could have a major impact on the role of the in-house recruiter. This could be the beginning of the end of in-house recruiters as we know them, or could be an evolution in to something completely different. Over the next 4 weeks I’m going to be exploring this in a bit more depth by talking to lots of recruiters and asking lots of questions about what is really going on. We will be hosting #DiceTru in partnership with EmployersOnDice in Mountain View, USA on the 15th August, and in San Francisco on 16th August, and then again as part of the #Kellylive hangout at #trulondon on 6th September.

I first started really thinking about this at the beginning of the year when I did a bit of a San Fran tour and caught up with the sourcing technology companies Gild, Entello, DiceOpenWeb and others. What surprised me at the time was that I was consistently getting told that it was hiring managers who were buying this technology directly, rather than sourcers or recruiters. Through the work I have been doing with social referral company RolePoint, I was becoming aware that more and more hiring managers were looking to run their own referral campaigns outside of the normal company process. RolePoint have had to go as far as creating a whole new work and data flow to accomodate this.

The data from the candidate experience awards in both North America and the UK was showing us that an increasing number of hiring managers were being set KPI’s for things like time to hire, cost of hire, candidate experience etc, the kind of metrics we had previously always associated with recruiters. We have also witnessed a growing reliance on the business to generate employer and culture brand content for talent attraction, and for employees to engage directly with potential candidates. My friend Rob Van’Elburg had also just started a new project with ING Bank to co-ordinate the training of all the hiring managers in technology across the world to run there own hiring campaigns through Taleo, from creating job specs to offer management. All of the technology recruiting for a global business being co-ordinated by one person. All the signs were pointing in one direction.

Probing a bit deeper in to why this was happening, with a number of hiring managers at global corporations, some of the reasoning behind this became clear. For a start, a lot of the tech jobs had never really existed before, and hiring managers wanted more access to who was out there in order to shape what they were actually looking for. We were also looking at data for a number of hiring managers where they were getting to see 5 in 1000 applicants by the time the ATS had sifted out 70%, usually on random criteria, the recruiter had eliminated CV’s, then done video or phone screens, then interviews, then other tests like assesments for team fit, skills etc before the last few standing got in frount of the hiring manager. It is no small wonder that hiring managers have started to want to look a lot closer at that pipeline for themselves.

I have also been aware of a new recruitment model evolving at Oracle in the EMEA region, which has since been adopted globally. Recruiting is a profit center that charges the business for their time. Recruiters are responsible for sourcing, (along with a sourcing and social media team), new potential hires. They don’t do any admin or logistics, that is all they do. Find people, qualify them, send them on to the hiring manager. The only time they ever get involved again is in helping to close candidates.They deffinitely don’t do any interviewing or anything like that. Very different, but very effective against aggressive hiring targets, with 30% of hires coming from social media, 30% from referral and 40% from direct sourcing. I’m begining to see this model being mirrored in other organisation looking to achieve the same thing, making recruiting being about sourcing, on a just in time basis.

That leaves us then with the question: If hiring managers are going to drive their own recruiting, what is going to happen to the recruiters? I asked this question at the #tru sessions at lRecruit earlier year. I was running a track that had about 18 heads of talent acquisition in the session. Industry analyst Josh Bersin was quick to pick up on this and ask if this really a trend in the organisations, given that most of the participants were senior and represented global brands. 18 of the 19 companies all confirmed that this is the direction they are going in, with more and more hiring managers taking on more and more of the day to day responsibility for hiring in their teams, assisted by some clever recruiting and assesment technology. It is becoming clear that this is much more than a trend, and not isolated to one region or one sector. That would be too simple.

My thinking is that in-house recruiters, and recruiting functions are going to go in one of four distinct directions:

1: The super recruiters. The last few years have seen the rise of the super recruiter. People like Matthew Jeffery at SAP, Chris Hoyt at Pepsico, Paul Maxin at Unilever, Jeff Moore at Google, Arie Ball at Sodexo, Donna Quintal at Sears, Anne-Marie O’Donnell at Oracle, Lars Schmidt at NPR, Ted Meulenkamp at Roche, and a number of others. Individuals who are much more strategic than tactical, who have high level influence. This is a great opportunity, but they are in the minority.

2: The sourcers – As with the Oracle model. 100% focussed on generating candidates by effective sourcing, and leaving the decision making, selection and recruiting to the line. A very lean, focussed role, with niche or location specialists. More opportunity for direct sourcing functions within larger organisations. Numbers driven, lean operations working on a just in time, on demand basis. Many of these roles could be filled by the new breed of contract recruiters, who come in as needed, and drop off when things are slack, or through RPO operations, importing expertise at the sourcing end. Potentially this will mean less opportunities for in-house recruiters.

3: Talent Networkers. I couldn’t think of a better term, although I’m sure there is one. This changes the recruiters role from filling jobs to populating the pipeline and the talent network. Sourcing people who are a cultural fit, with longer term potential as hires, and organising the data in the talent network for the hiring managers to recruit from. Whilst this role is proving valuable for those companies who go down this route, few companies will prove as forward thinking. We will also see a rise in companies like Norman Broadbent company Social Media Search providing this as an outsourced function.

4: Administrators – Managing the admin and logistics around recruiting such as interview scheduling, assessments etc on behalf of line manager, back to the days of the personnel manager. Whilst this has to be the least appealing option, cost considerations may well see this as the most likely route.

You might think I’m mad in thinking this, but it is too big a trend to ignore. You can come and disagree/discuss/debate this point with me at #DiceTru in Mountain View on the 15th Aug, SanFran on the 16th or #trulondon on the 6th Sept. I look forward to the debate!

Bill

#TRULondon Interviewers Personality Profile

trulondon300x186As ever, I am very excited in anticipation of #TRULondon 7 tomorrow, which is Wednesday and Thursday, 5th and 6th March. Whilst there is always a great time to be had and much to be learned from all attendees, part of the excitement comes from knowing that anything can happen, as nothing is ever predictable at #TRU events.

What I do know, however, is that #TRULondon will be filled with enthusiastic professionals involved in recruitment at all stages in the process. With so many experienced recruiters in attendance, we have a little freebie to whet your whistle. In conjunction with PCEvaluate, we have devised a unique Personality Profile Report for professional interviewers. The results of this report are specifically designed to show how your own personality, as an interviewer, has a direct effect on your interviewing style, and of course your candidates.
Try the report, and let me know how accurate it is at #TRULondon.

You can see the original on the PCEvaluate site here http://pcevaluate.com/trulondon-free-interviewer-personality-profile/

 

Guest Post: Ivo Bottcher – Extreme candidate experience #trulondon

Ivo is a Social Media enthusiast with a cross-disciplinary and cross-cultural background. He previously lead two candidate experience tracks at TruMadrid and TruGeneva. Within the last 2 years, he analyzed different Applicant Tracking Systems and focused on the use of HR and Social Media from an applicant’s perspective. He currently works at Small-Improvements, an award winning start up that provides a modern approach towards performance and peer reviews. Besides Human Resources and Social Media, he also passionate about International Relations/International Politics. Ivo will be leading the candidate experience track at #trulondon on 6th – 7th March. In this post he proposes a controversial fix for the broken candidate experience.

The candidate experience has been playing an important part for me for a while. Going through the application and candidate processes for start ups and bigger organiations in Europe and the US, I gained a lot of insights. For the candidate experience track at TruLondon, I would like to discuss these three issues:

1. Technology as an enabler and barrier for applicants

2. How to make ATS more efficient (and applicant friendly)

3. Application fees: A win-win situation

1. Technology as an enabler and barrier for applicants

Bill Boorman recently posted in a blog post about the candidate experience arguing
that “Technology is used as a barrier rather than an enabler,” and I could not agree more with him. While thinking of technologies catered to HR, I guess Applicant Tracking Systems is often the first thing that comes to one’s mind. Companies have found ways to manage and deal with hundreds or even thousands of applications for one vacant position. And applicants have figured out ways to write ATS applications and use the autofill function of their browser. Also, sourcing techniques and tools for recruiters are now available as new technologies are used, but applicants are aware of these and the world-wide web is full of blog posts on keyword doping for LinkedIn and resumes. So there are various ways to use technology as an enabler or barrier. During the candidate experience track at TruLondon, I will discuss these tools from an applicant perspective, and will share new technologies and techniques for using them. For example, applicants can use sales software (like yesware.com) to track their applications or use a gmail add-on (rapportive.com) to source email addresses of HR managers.

2. How to make ATS more efficient (and applicant friendly)

Applicant Tracking Systems are a great way to manage incoming applications. Nonetheless, for most applicants they are a nightmare, because applicants are not aware about what happens with the information after submitting, they are all different and take too long to fill out. And, in worst cases, applicants will never hear back or receive any feedback. Often job postings are not clear enough, and don’t highlight the “killer questions” or requirements with enough clarity. It is understandable that while working with an ATS, the sky is the limit with the number of applications because they are easy to filter out. But my impression is that companies do not really care about the time and effort applicants put into an application. An indicator that a job posting might be not good enough is when most of the applicants are not matching the filters before a company considers reading through the application. The goal of each company should be to receive a limited number of highly qualified applications rather than a huge number of less qualified ones.
Also, why not leave the cover letter or motivational letter out for the first initial screening (ATS)?. I always found it a pain to fill out ATS and submit a cover letter while knowing that most likely no one will ever read this letter when they filter me out because of a ATS category. It would be a fair gesture towards applicants to openly say that you need the ATS to pre filter because you receive too many applications, but also let the applicants know that after passing ATS, they must then submit a cover letter. This way the cover letter will be more specific to the needs of the company and position in question, which fits the interest of both parties. In the end, the applicant and the company looking for someone will benefit from this. And it shows that the company respects the time of their prospective employees.

3. Application fees: a win-win situation

Lastly, I wanted to share an idea and would love to hear some comments on paying for applications. When prospective students apply for universities, they are required to pay an administrative fee, e.g. a non-refundable application fee of $70 for New York University. Why not do the same for job applications? Of course it sounds crazy and unfair but here are my points:

- There still has to be a non-paid option. The paid option is a consideration service that guarantees a recruiter will take a look at my application.
- With a paid option, applicants will take more time to read the job description before applying and choosing to use or not to use the paid option.
- Applicants who are convinced that they are a great fit will take the risk and pay; e.g. offer a “I’m convinced I’m a really good fit application option,” for $50.
- The fee collected will be only used to improve the hiring process and to evaluate the application.
- This process has to be as transparent as possible to avoid unhappy applicants and fraud.

I understand that it is impossible and unfair to let all applicants pay for this; it might seem like fraud or scam. But what about having the option of a “pro” application that costs $50, which means that an application passes the ATS black box and applicants are aware that a HR manager will directly look at the application? In this case, I think of the fee as paying for a consideration service by the company. ATS is a barrier especially for unconventional backgrounds, so why not offer a refundable “pro” application fee that an applicant receives if he/she is invited for an interview. This way, companies can decrease the number of desperate applicants who apply for every job generically, and bring more qualified candidates into the hiring process. I think it will lead to an overall win-win situation; what do you think?”

You can connect with Ivo at:

Ivo is a Social Media enthusiast with a cross-disciplinary and cross-cultural background. He previously lead two candidate experience tracks at TruMadrid and TruGeneva. Within the last 2 years, he analyzed different Applicant Tracking Systems and focused on the use of HR and Social Media from an applicant’s perspective. He currently works at Small-Improvements, an award winning start up that provides a modern approach towards performance and peer reviews. Besides Human Resources and Social Media, he also passionate about International Relations/International Politics.

LinkedIn: www.linkedin.com/in/ibottcher Twitter: @ibottcher Personal Website: www.ivobottcher.com

Buy tickets for #trulondon. 10 left.

 

Introducing @MikeVangel. #trulondon

 

Vangel at #RIS11

I’m excited that Mike Vangel, the VP for  client talent acquisition strategy at TMP Worldwide and AIA in the UK, is joining us for #trulondon on the 6th and 7th March. Mike has been leading the way in mobile and social recruiting over the last 3 – 4 years, and has some great stories to share. I asked Mike to outline the tracks he wants to run, and his thoughts ahead of the event. This is what Mike had to say:

 

“I am looking forward to attending #trulondon in a couple of weeks. Hope you will be there, too, and perhaps I will get to meet you. I am a Yank from the states, Boston to be precise, but I work globally in the field of recruitment. I will be leading a few tracks so I thought it would be a good idea to tell you a little bit about myself in advance as you go through the thoughtful process of choosing which sessions to attend and which ones you won’t. Hope you’ll attend mine if you think we’re a good fit but it’s okay if you select out once I’ve told you a bit about myself.

I would classify myself as a “practitioner” that is to say I actually do the things I talk about. Interestingly enough, my son considers me an inventor. He may be on to something with that classification, too. I realize there is a whole cottage industry of self-appointed “gurus” and “thought leaders” who bless what they think is the tactic du jour embracing it as their own but never actually do the work. That’s not my scene and to be honest I don’t have much patience for any of them. They remind me a lot of the know-it-all jerks I had to put up with in high school. God, I hated them. Unlike them I say what I am going to do and try my best to do what I say I will. It should not be a novel concept but unfortunately in this day and age it seems to be the exception and not the rule.

I believe in first-mover advantage. If you are waiting for tons of people to tell you what will work, you are probably too late to get in the game. I believe in piloting ideas that hold promise but put them within a scalable framework to validate “proof of concept” as quickly as possible. I believe in the power of data and the power of brand. I only collect actionable metrics to define success and continually work very hard to refine those results. I am direct. I am honest. I would rather tell you the truth than what is a comfortable un-truth. I have dedicated the better part of my career to the sharing and promotion of best practices within the employment industry. I believe in giving back and paying forward. Again, not a novel concept but not very common these days.

Like Bill I don’t believe you have to charge people thousands of Euros at a conference to learn something new. Chances are you will learn more at #trulondon for £150 than one of those other conferences (probably filled with self-appointed “gurus” and “thought leaders” who’ve really never done the work) that will charge you ten times as much if you come with an open mind to one of my sessions and are not afraid to be told (or even better tell) an inconvenient truth.

I don’t get paid for speaking at events and never have. That’s not what I’m about. However, I have presented at Facebook, Microsoft, the Mobile Marketing Association and led recruitment conferences as far away as Australia. I believe strongly in the power of social media and mobile for recruitment and have the data to back it up. And I share.

I fundamentally believe Recruitment is very different from HR and I am glad that it is. I am not sure if HR will ever have a strategic seat at the table but Recruitment surely should.

The areas that interest me the most are:

1. Why recruitment ROI is so important and how to optimize it
2. How it compares with other sourcing channels
3. How to effectively use mobile to recruit
4. What’s worked for me and what hasn’t (sometimes I have learned more from my failures than my successes)
5. Identifying and stopping abuses within Recruitment

The tracks I hope to lead are:

1. “Complete Mobilization Is Possible Now.”
2. “How to Drive Hires & Establish True ROI for Your Social Media for Recruitment Efforts”
3. “Catfishing for Employers and Jobseekers” Why authenticity is so important.
4. “Every Time You Say ‘Gamification’ a Unicorn Dies”

5. “Is Your Employer Brand a Victim of Identity Theft?”

6. “Internal Mobility – Fact or Fiction?”

I am looking forward to a wonderful “unconference” at #trulondon and hopefully meeting you!

Cheers,

Mike”

I know Mike well from #truBoston, and a few other events over the last few years. We regularly exchange notes. You can get one of the remaining tickets to see Mike at #trulondon HERE. There are only 12 tickets left, and you wouldn’t want to miss it.

Bill

What impacts on candidate experience? #CandEUK #trulondon

I haven’t blogged for the last few weeks, having been out-of-town at #Sourcecon, and in San Francisco for a week working with social referral start-up RolePoint. It was a great trip with lots of learning, and new tech to look at. Over the last few months I’ve also been busy helping to judge the UK edition of the #CandEs, the candidate experience awards, which has meant ploughing through plenty of data and feedback, as well as interviewing the companies involved. Next Tuesday we are going to be recognizing the winners at a presentation in London. Good practice in this area deserves recognition, and the #CandEs UK presents the perfect opportunity to do this. I’m also delighted that we will be sharing the findings, as well as case studies from the participants at #trulondon on the 6′th and 7′th March.

Whilst I can’t share the outcomes yet, I have drawn some clear learning points on what impacts on the quality of the candidate experience. Lots of recruiters have good and honest intentions to treat candidates well, but process and volume of work ties them down. These are some of my thoughts on candidate experience:

  • The quality of the experience has a direct relationship with the quantity of applications.
  • The more involved in the end to end recruiting process the hiring manager is, the better the experience.
  • Few people consider recruiter experience, but the two are massively related.
  • When hiring companies use agencies, feedback is  least likely.
  • The candidate and applicant process should be two different things
  • Talent networks keep people and companies connected beyond the transaction
  • Killer questions in an ATS should be asked before applying.
  • Search should always come before broadcast
  • Technology is used as a barrier rather than an enabler

These are just a few of my thoughts. A headline in a newspaper today announced that over 1,700 people applied for 8 jobs at a branch of Costa Coffee in Nottingham. How can those applicants have any kind of experience, except a bad one. These are for jobs just above minimum wage. Surely there was a better way of attracting applicants, (like asking for referrals), than posting ads and getting flooded. Companies need to be doing more than talking about candidate experience. All of these applicants in Nottingham could well be local and customers of Costa. Don’t treat them well and they will be looking for their nearest Starbucks, and that would prove very costly.

I will be sharing the specific feedback after the awards. Join us at #trulondon to discuss candidate experience in more detail, from the #CandE UK awards and from candidates first hand.

Bill

Applicants, Candidates And Content Strategy #truLondon

image by Oscar Mager

I’ve been thinking quite a lot recently about where jobs fit in with content and content strategy. I crystalized this thinking last week at #truLondon. We know from all the research from the likes of Evenbase, that what potential  applicants want before they hit the apply button is more information on the company and the job. What we are seeing is that job seekers are just bored of the application process, spending time filling in questions and answers. The average time I’m seeing it takes to complete a first time application with a corporate client is 2 hours. That’s right, you read it correctly, 2 hours, and a minimum of 50 clicks and 50 screens. It’s hard and it’s horrible to apply for a job, then what happens next?

The feedback from the Candees (Candidate Experience Awards) delivered by Gerry Crispin at #truLondon is not a lot really. Very little feedback and a never hear again attitude. The upshot of this is that potential applicants want to be 100% sure of 2 things before they hit apply and go in to the process:

1: They have a good chance of getting the job

2: They really want the job

This means that you need to provide enough information to answer both of these questions before they will go through the pain of an application. The traditional copy writers will jump in and say that this is all down to poorly crafted job descriptions that describe nothing but a list of duties. There is a little bit of merit in this argument, but a text document is really one-dimensional and quite boring. Doesn’t matter how well you write it. It’s often not enough to elicit the type of response you really want and need. The ones left in the funnel are the desperate and the unemployable who have the time and the desire to stick with the process. It is a frightening thought. It also reminds me of the track by John Sumser, where he made the point that the talent shortage is actually caused by over-supply. There is so many people in the job market that it becomes hard to reach or find the ones who are right.

My feeling is that the more we think of jobs as content rather than postings, the more likely we are to solve both of these problems. Increasingly I’m seeing that the real benefit of social recruiting is that you lower the volume of response, but increase the quality of those who apply. People who better fit the company and the job, share your values and have chosen to apply for your job rather than any job. This will also help to solve the Sumser theory by reaching the people who are the right fit. Great content also makes it easy for applicants to see if they fit, encouraging them to apply.

In this post I have been speaking about applicants. I took this from Paul Maxin of Unilever’s track where he spoke about separating applicants and candidates, and having a different strategy and approach for each. Applicants are those people who apply, where as candidates are those people who have got past the application stage and are in the recruitment process at any stage. This means thinking about applicant experience and candidate experience as two different things.I hear the old chestnut often that applying for a job shouldn’t be easy. I accept that getting a job shouldn’t be a walk in the park, but should applying for a job really be that hard? My thinking is that being an applicant should be easy. It is really a matter of giving a recruiter access to your details to tell you if you should be proceeding in to the tough job of becoming a candidate or join the talent network for another opportunity. That has got to offer a better applicant experience, rather than treating applicants and candidates when they are clearly not qualified to be one.

From a content point of view this means having different content streams for applicants around the job and the company, and around the candidate process about what happens next, and more detailed specific content the further the candidate goes through the process. I recently looked at the CERN progress chart that enables any candidate to log in at any time and see where they are up to in the process at any time. This is brilliant for the candidate experience.

Applicant content needs to be around the job, the culture and the values. If we view jobs as content, then you can build a content strategy around the job. I’m thinking job spec, video, pictures on a pin board related to the job, blog post and social connections with the people who do the job. I also see a place for a Jobgram type infographic here that shows the job in a different way. All of this content can be used to populate a culture site (as opposed to a career site) that enables people to properly understand the culture and values of the business from the people who work there.

These are some of my thoughts after an excellent #truLondon. Thanks everyone who contributed,

Bill